Rongrong Liu: Color and Accessory Empire

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Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

 

 

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Photography and Text by Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017
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COLOR AND ACCESSORY EMPIRE

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In this series of street trend photos, colors and accessories are the main elements I observed and combined in this series of street fashion photographs.

First, color. Playing with color is a constant theme in fashion industry. The pastely color- blue, pink and purple has been in trend since last year, and most people apply it to clothing. I think it is a good try to combine it in beauty and accessories. Other than the pastely colors, I tend to use either black and white, which has a lot to do with the background and the shadow, or bright colors, which should be both simple and eye-catching. Good color styling highlights the outfit and bad color styling destroys it.

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Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

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Second, glasses. Last season, Gucci launched the “nerd chic” style. The inspiration of “The Nerdy Beauty” comes from that. The pearly hat and the bright blue color tries to add vigor to the style in order not to make the model a pure “nerd”.

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Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

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Additionally, I see a strong trend for geometric glasses recently, which emphasizes a lot on the shape of the glasses. Therefore, some brands like Percy Lau breaks the traditional design, which a round or rectangular frame tightly holds the glasses, and deconstructs the geometry to give a new breath to the glasses. These elements are included in the sunglass and the plain glass I use for the models. Moreover, it is a heated trend to have jewelry design as part of the accessories, which I have the pearly hat and the glasses with some extra decoration.

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Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

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The last trend I want to illustrate is unisex, meaning man and woman sharing the same type of clothes. All the tops and accessories on the male model are from my own closet, and as we can see, the clothes are mostly pretty oversized-looking, but all fit perfectly on him. The gender boundary in styling is getting more and more ambiguous.

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Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

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Portrait of Rongrong Liu by Michael Heath, Copyright 2017

Portrait of Rongrong Liu by Michael Heath, Copyright 2017

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About The Author: Rongrong Liu is a Junior enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2019

Posted in Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Fashion, Glamour, Models, Photography, Popular Culture

Noa Baker: Street Fashion


 

Photography and Text by Noa Baker, Copyright 2017

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STREET FASHION

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I’ve never felt so small-town in my life. I had “dressed up” for today, which meant grudgingly leaving my seven pairs of sweatpants in the bottom drawer and squeezing myself into the single pair of black jeans I own (when did I buy these? The seventh grade?), and swapping my regular pony tail with a less-regular pony tail. What was a suburban sweatshirt-dweller doing heading to New York City during fashion week, you might ask?

Great question. I was asking myself the same thing as I boarded the train, clutching multiple camera bags and tripping over my sneaker laces.

But to my utmost surprise, fashion week was everything—and more. It was seductive. Passionate. Fast paced and non-judgmental. I was expecting a bunch of super-thin tall blond super models and was instead faced with a deliciously diverse group of eclectic dressers. One model in hijab bustled past me, overlarge sunglasses pushed to her eyes and her runway pass to her face, a shield against the paparazzi. Afros are in this year—so many women had hair teased up to the sky that my pictures appear to have a fuzzy halo around the edges.

There was a faked shy-ness in the passers-by that I noticed, though. Many hid behind large sunglasses as they gazed stonily passed the paparazzies, or else glared into phone screens. The fashion on the streets became less about the clothes the pedestrian models were wearing than the persona—the iPhones, the headphones, the overlarge shades. As the day wore on, I became less interested in the outfits and more interested in the accessories that people hid behind. What makes the fashion, I wondered?   I tried to collect images that captured the persona of fashion week—the runway facial expressions hiding behind head accessories, the detached look of someone hurrying down the street and distracted by a phone call.

Is fashion only in what people wear?

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About The Author: Noa Baker is a Sophomore enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2020

 

Posted in Blog, Documentary, Environment, Fashion, Glamour, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Women

Corey Fader: Observing the Trends at New York Fashion Week


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Photography and Text by Corey Fader, Copyright 2017

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OBSERVING THE TRENDS AT NEW YORK FASHION WEEK

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In New York City every February and September there is one week dedicated solely to fashion. It is a time for clothing designers and models to show off the latest trends in the industry to potential buyers, media, and the public audience that lines the streets. This September I decided to make the trip to see up close the latest styles that are currently popular in our culture.

A trend that immediately stood out was the desire to wear vibrant pieces of clothing. Especially in the case of the women, the far majority of outfits were vivid with interesting color patterns and designs. In the situations where this was not the case, they most often had a flashy accessory in the form of a bright purse, reflective sunglasses, a gaudy hat, or anything of the like. Red in particular was heavily present in a large percentage of the overall outfits and accessories.

On a similar note, another prevalent fad was colorfully dyed hair, which was commonly observed for both men and women. Unlike many people who dye their hair regularly, the models participating in Fashion Week used colors that were totally unnatural. For example, green and purple were prominently featured throughout the week.

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About the Author: Corey Fader is a Senior enrolled in the Wharton Business School, University of Pennsylvania. Class of 2018. To access additional articles by Corey Fader, go herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/corey-fader-excess/

 

Posted in Blog, Documentary, Environment, Glamour, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Student Life, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women

Lab Work: K Vaughn Scarves, Fall Collection 2017

 

LAB WORK: K VAUGHN SCARVES – FALL COLLECTION 2017

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UPENN: PHOTOGRAPHY & FASHION

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PHOTOGRAPHERS

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Alexis Masino

Corey Fader

Elizabeth Beugg

Noa Baker

Amber Shi

Jinghong Cui

Joy Lewis

Karishma Sheth

Sharon Song

Rongrong Liu

Jessica Moh

Noel Zheng

Michael Heath

Linda Ruan

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Makeup: Aysha Silagy

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Models: Main Line Models & Talent

Cassie Fagan

Danielle Gauthier

Grace DelPizzo

Katty Pena

Kevin Robinson

Nick Nocella

Y’nya Maybank

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To see additional articles about K Vaughn, scarf designer, go herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/chi-aguwa-k-vaughn-scarves-winter-collection-2016/

 

Posted in Art, Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Fashion, Friends of TWS, Gifts, Glamour, Men, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life, Women

Victoria Meng: Life at the Penn Museum

 

Photography, Video and Text by Victoria Meng, Copyright 2017

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LIFE AT THE PENN MUSEUM

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Sometimes on rainy afternoons in the Penn Museum, when the air is more musty than usual, and the light is just dim enough, I feel as if I can almost hear the alluring whisper of the past, the echo of music and laughter from a forgotten era.

On my first day of work at the Penn Museum, my boss took me on a tour. As we walked among the cool, darkened hallways that house over a million artifacts, I learned about the museum’s illustrious history.

At the end of the 19th century, Provost William Pepper commissioned the museum as a humble way to house artifacts. Through the course of the next few decades, the Penn Museum would evolve into a prestigious institution where Philadelphia’s elite could ascend to higher society.

From the exotic architectural motifs to the smallest details in building fixtures, the Penn Museum would’ve been an incredible marvel at the time that it was constructed. Complete with mosaics designed by Tiffanys, seemingly no expense was spared in creating an “eclectic Victorian extravaganza.”

Yet, as I recount my memory of the museum tour, I remember one detail in particular.

In 1929, Alexander Stirling Calder, was commissioned to create a statue for the European gallery. While his father was known for putting William Penn on top of City Hall and his son reached international acclaim for his mobiles, Stirling made his own statement with a depiction of a Greek maiden styled like a Roaring 20s flapper.

Ironically, it was this anachronistic detail that really became my inspiration. This proof that the museum had once been a backdrop for Gatsby-scale parties made history more real to me than ever before. In fact, the more I looked into the Museum during this era, the more true life became stranger than fiction.

At one point in the early 20th century, a glamorous reception attracted more than eight hundred guests. Two of these guests, perhaps under the influence of too much champagne, allegedly climbed on top of and eventually collapsed ancient Chinese tomb figures of camels. While the ruins were eventually restored to original condition, this raucous memory lives on in my imagination.

Ultimately, my inspiration for my portraits was derived from the Museum’s core mission: to help us remember who we are and where we came from. The more I learn about anthropology, the more I realize that although the way that we live has changed greatly, who we are as humans has hardly wavered.

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Portrait of Victoria Meng by Simeon Ristic, Copyright 2017

Posted in Architecture, Art, Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, History, News, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Student Life, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women