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Upcoming Events: Heroes Awards Brunch

Heroes Awards Brunch: Hotel Monaco, April 7, 2019

Heroes Awards Brunch: Hotel Monaco, April 7, 2019

 

 

PHILADELPHIA

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Upcoming Events: Heroes Awards Brunch

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HEROES was started over ten years ago to spotlight and honor the unwavering dedication of community leaders and organizations to advance the rights and wellbeing of the greater Philadelphia regions LGBTQ community. Through the nomination process, HEROES identifies youth, adults, nonprofits, straight allies, and businesses who have bold ideas, act with selfless intention, are admired for their integrity, and are regarded as courageous in advancing LGBTQ equality in the Greater Philadelphia Area and beyond. DVLF honors these HEROES annually to celebrate their character and to encourage others to act heroically.

 

Since 1993, DVLF has served the greater Philadelphia LGBTQ community through philanthropy. More specifically, DVLF works to empower and advance the LGBTQ community through grant-making, scholarships, advocacy, community leadership development and education. DVLF has established an endowment that provides crucial support to the diverse array of LGBTQ nonprofit organizations and programs striving to address our community’s pressing needs. This includes: youth homelessness, civil rights, the elderly, cultural/ educational entities, and more.

 

As we enter its 26th year, we are looking to partner with businesses, individuals and organizations that share our values and which are interested in deepening their connections with our dynamic donor base, our stakeholders, and our region’s LGBTQ community, including its thought leaders.

To access tickets for the event, click here: https://co.clickandpledge.com/sp/d2/default.aspx?wid=71189

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Editor’s Note: There will be a live auction in which and original vintage photograph by Tony Ward will be auctioned to benefit the LBGT community.

 

Posted in Advertising, Announcements, Blog, Current Events, Environment, Friends of TWS, History, Men, News, Philadelphia, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life, Travel, Women

A.H. Scott: Yes, She Is!

A_H_Scott_Artwork_Tony_Ward_Studio_graphics

Artwork by A.H. Scott, Copyright 2019

 

 

Text and Artwork by A.H. Scott, Copyright 2019

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YES, SHE IS!
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She is mother
She is daughter
She is sister
She is affection’s flourish
She is a forthright ally across the horizon
She is comfort like no other
She is half of the Celestial puzzle
She is magnet to your core
She holds heaven’s surprise
She stands with principle
She falls
She crawls
She is fire
She is demure
She is a sigh
She is roar
She is all that the world can endure
She is days of past
She is the warrior that outlasts
She is now
She is beacon of tomorrow
She is wisdom in a wink of an eye
She is mystique
She is spry
She is unique
She is all which you seek
She is contradiction
She is delectation
She is infatuation
She is spotlight’s siren
She is dismissal’s damsel
She absorbs the tears you cry
She is protector of the weak
She is I Can
She is I Can’t
She is silence
She is rant
She is courage
She makes a plan
She battles the strong
She kisses destiny whenever she can
She is dawn of anew
She is morning dew
She is I
She is you
She is her
She is what, why, when, where, how and who
Yes, she is everything through and through
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About The Author: A.H. Scott is a poet based in New York City and frequent contributor to Tony Ward Studio. To read additional articles by A. H. Scott, go here: http://tonywardstudio.com/blog/a-h-scott-sour-moneybags-dumbasssss-song/
 
Posted in Affiliates, Blog, Current Events, Environment, Friends of TWS, History, Popular Culture, Women

Bob Shell: The Digital Era

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Photo: Anthony Colagreco, Copyright 2019

 

Text by Bob Shell, Copyright 2019

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Photography by Anthony Colagreco, Copyright 2019

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The Digital Era

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Many of you reading this came of age in the digital photography era. Most likely you’ve never used, maybe never even seen, a film camera. My girlfriend Marion was like that. The first time I handed her a film camera she took a shot and then looked at the back of the camera to see the picture – which, of course, was not there! People who grew up with digital photography can’t imagine having to wait to see the pictures. When I first got started, unless you had a darkroom and developed and printed your own, you had to wait days to see your photos. When I had my first camera shop in the early 1970s we had our photofinishing done by a big commercial company called Colorcraft. Their courier picked up film from us every day and delivered the finished photos. As I recall, it took three or four days to get your pictures back. A bit later in the 70s came the innovation of next day delivery. People were amazed to get their pictures that fast. Next came the minilabs that pharmacies, grocery stores, and discount stores installed. Suddenly you could get your pictures back the same day! Some places even offered one hour service. The race was on to be the fastest, but quality was often lost in the rush. People got back poorly exposed or otherwise flawed pictures, and assumed it was their fault, never knowing they could have gotten good pictures from a better lab.

Today those big photofinishing companies are long gone, as are most of the smaller labs. The last lab in my area, run by an old friend of mine, closed at the end of 2018. People who still shoot film pretty much have to develop and print their own unless they live near one of the few labs still in business.

Kodak Alaris has just reintroduced Ektachrome 100 Professional in 35mm rolls and Super-8 cartridges. They must think there’s a market for it, but that leaves open the question of where to get it processed. (kodakalaris.com)

The Lomography people have recently introduced black and white Potsdam 100 and Berlin 400 films. These come in 35mm and 120 roll film sizes, and are “cut from old stocks of a cinematic emulsion, produced by a legendary German company.”. Available online from Lomography (www.lomography.com)

I don’t know much about the current Lomography company. I know they got their start selling a compact camera made by LOMO, Leningrad Optical and Mechanical Works, in St. Petersburg (formerly Leningrad in Soviet days) and turned that little camera into a cult object. They’ve expanded to selling a wide variety of photographic products. I’d guess that the “legendary German company” they refer to is Agfa. Apparently Agfa had large stocks of film on hand when they went out of the film business. Rollei was selling rebranded Agfa black and white film under their name for some time. In cold storage black and white film will still be good for many years. In a bit of sales hype, they say, “Steeped in a rich past and prestige, this mighty monochrome is not just a tribute to history — rather a part of it.”

I used to collect Soviet era cameras and lenses from Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. While the little LOMO point and shoot, the LC-1 was nothing special, LOMO also made the only Russian-built professional camera, the Almas (Diamond in Russian). During the Cold War days, Soviet photographers were cut off from the Japanese professional cameras the rest of the world used. LOMO was tasked with the job of producing a camera for Soviet professional photographers. Superficially, the Almas looks like a Nikon F2, but on closer inspection is revealed as a unique camera. The removeable prism housing is styled like Nikon’s, as are the interchangeable focusing screens. The camera body looks like a Minolta and has a shutter that looks like a Copal, but is a unique LOMO design. To carry on the hybridization, the lens mount is Pentax K mount. The camera is very robustly built and most samples I’ve seen show considerable use. There is a connection on the bottom for a motor drive, but as far as I have been able to determine, that motor drive was never produced. The 50mm lens on my sample is excellent. It’s too bad that this noble experiment vanished when the Soviet Union collapsed and photographers in former Soviet republics gained access to cameras from the outside world. My Almas has no light meter, but there was a meter prism available in small quantities that is rare today. My Almas is the star of my collection of Soviet cameras.

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About The Author: Bob Shell is a professional photographer, author and former editor in chief of Shutterbug Magazine. He is currently serving a 35 year sentence for involuntary manslaughter for the death of Marion Franklin, one of his former models. Shell was recently moved from Pocahontas State Correctional Center, Pocahontas, Virginia to River North Correctional Center 329 Dellbrook Lane Independence, VA 24348.  Mr. Shell continues to claim his innocence. He is serving the 11th year of his sentence. To read more letters from prison by Bob Shell, click here: http://tonywardstudio.com/blog/bob-shell-musical-instruments/

 

Posted in Affiliates, Blog, Cameras, Documentary, Engineering, Film, History, Light Table, News, Photography, Popular Culture, Science

Katie Kerl: Picking up the Pieces

Digital Montage of Katie Kerl by Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

Digital Montage of Katie Kerl by Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

 

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Text by Katie Kerl, Copyright 2019

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Picking up the Pieces

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Nothing heals a broken heart better then love and support from your
parents and friends. I’m very lucky and have the most down to earth
parental units out there. I have mentioned that a few times in past
articles, but this time my mother and father really outdid themselves.
 
Break ups are never easy. Getting your belongings back, half moving back into your place that you were using for storage, feeling drained, and endless explaining to people about what happened. After all of that, I do have a certain peace of mind knowing I made the right decision for my own happiness.
 
Now, previously I would have went out and tried to busy
myself serial dating, drinking, and not truly recovering. I did download all of the dating apps out of pure anger, but this time I couldn’t bring myself to meet anyone off of it.  It’s not a productive use of my time, or going to make me less angry . I got through my work day, did some yoga, and meal planned. That was about all I had the
energy for the last month.
 
So what changed? My ever praying mother came and helped me. My
father is my personality type and more of my best friend. He has always
listened to me over coffee, or glass of bourbon. Reiterating I do not
need a man to be happy, or take care of me. He said that was his job even in my
thirties. I’m forever grateful for everything he has done for me. I now
realize as an adult I could never have had it both ways with my parents.
Someone had to be the voice of reason and tell me no. My mother was
that parent.
 
She recently turned 60, and we had a really fun weekend celebrating. I
gave her a birthstone ring.  I also wrote down 60 reasons she is the best
mother, and put it in a pretty wooden box. I realized I never told her all
of those things I appreciate now growing up. Now she can hold onto that forever. 
 
I let her know I was struggling going through all my stuff at home, and
didn’t have the space for it all. She came for the weekend to help me. In four days she pulled everything out of the closets, kitchen cabinets, and storage.
She helped me create new spaces for all the stuff I had accumulated. I was floored, Marie Kondo has nothing on my mother. She turned my pantry into a shoe cabinet , and a piece of my entertainment unit for my bags. 
 
She also just listened to me with no judgment. I made dinner the one night , took her to my favorite brunch spot in my area called Morning Glory Diner,
we walked the Italian market , and did some vintage shopping here in
Philadelphia . I couldn’t have asked for a nicer weekend. I feel like a
complete human being again, and at home in my own place.
 
She will always be there to help pick up the pieces. Life does not get
any easier in your thirties; you will still need your mother. No one can get through life alone. She has never given up on me even in my most unlovable moments.
 
She really does not get why I like to go to Miami for my birthday, but
always goes shopping with me for it.  She gets  music sets me free, just like
getting tattooed does. My parents only want the best for me and that’s happiness. 
 
I hope everyone finds theirs as well.
 
– Kerl up with Kate
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About The AuthorKatie Kerl. Born 1984. Raised in Drexel Hill,  Pennsylvania. Attended Drexel University for Behavioral  Psychology. Occupation: commercial/ residential  design Philadelphia resident since 2011 . Hobbies include: Foodie, whiskey drinker,  fitness , cooking  , tattoos & house music lover. Instagram:  @kerl_up_with_kateTo access additional articles by Katie Kerl, click here: http://tonywardstudio.com/blog/katie-kerl-you-dont-have-to-move-on-to-let-go/
 
Posted in Affiliates, Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, Health Care, News, Popular Culture, Science, Women

Bob Shell: Musical Instruments

Photo Illustration: Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

Photo Illustration: Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

 

 

Text by Bob Shell, Copyright 2019

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MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

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I’ve made a sort of study of musical instruments from around the world, each with its own unique sound. From India there is the sitar, best known, but also the sarod, sort of an Indian lute, and another stringed instrument called the veena. All get their unique sounds from having brass strings. (You can hear sitar on recordings by Ravi Shankar or his daughter Anoushka. Sarod by Ali Akbar Khan. Veena by S.I. Balachander.). In Japan there is the koto, a sort of horizontal harp with silk strings, which can be heard in recordings by Kimio Ito. The Chinese have a plethora of instruments with names I never learned. You can hear many in The Chieftains in China. The Chinese also use the pentatonic scale, with only five notes in an “octave,” which is why their music sounds weird to us. The pentatonic scale was developed in ancient Greece, at least so say the historians. Maybe the Greeks got it from Egypt, or even older cultures. Frustratingly we have no idea what ancient Egyptian, Greek, Babylonian, etc., music sounded like since they had no musical notation. We can only guess.

We know the Greeks, Egyptians, and other ancient cultures had stringed and wind instruments because both are depicted in their art, but we don’t know what they sounded like. Of course, all cultures had drums and percussion instruments.

The tabla drums of India are made of brass with hide drumheads that can be tuned so that different parts of the drumhead produce different sounds. They are. normally played in sets of two, a smaller one with higher pitch and a larger one with lower pitch. They are played with the fingers, palms, and even elbows. To hear a modern use of tabla drums, listen to Centa Terbaik by Tasya Rosmala. All Indian instruments, so far as I know, are played sitting on the floor, usually with half-lotus or even full-lotus positioning of the legs.

The Arabs have a large drum called a dumbeg and a smaller durbeki, played with the hands or short drumsticks. The Irish drum, played with both ends of a short drumstick is the bodhran. I’m sure the Turkish drums have names, but I don’t recall them. In Japan once I was treated to a performance of traditional big Japanese drums that are mounted with the drumheads vertical, and the players go at them with sticks the size of ax handles, attacking the drums as if trying to destroy them. Very, very loud! Almost .more of an athletic event than a musical performance. The performers wear loin cloths and are very muscular. The whole thing has a very savage feel.

Of course Africa and the Caribbean are where drums, a great variety of types and sizes, are the main instruments. To hear African drums at their best listen to the Missa Luba, a native Congolese mass performed with voices and drums. I’ve heard great drum music in the Caribbean, and, of course, there are the steel drums. There is a good recording of the Trinidad and Tobago Steel Drum Band available. Surprisingly, they hail from Rochester, NY! I don’t know how they tune those steel drums, but the sound can be beautiful.

Today the Mediterranean peoples have a variety of stringed instruments played like guitars. The Arab people have their oud, a fretless gut-stringed lute/guitar. To hear an oud played well, listen to Hala Laya by The Devil’s Anvil, from the album Hard Rock From The Middle East (where you’ll also hear dumbeg and durbeki drums). The Greeks have their bouzouki, also similar to a guitar. It is my understanding that the guitar itself was developed from the lute in Spain during the Moorish period. The Irish and Scot people, who originated in the eastern Mediterranean, took the Persian/Greek bagpipe north with them, along with the pentatonic scale. I’m not sure who carried musical instruments to Russia, perhaps the Rus brought them back from their viking raids on other cultures, but once Eastern Orthodox Christianity took hold, the balalaika, with its three strings and three-sided sound box (symbolizing the Trinity) was no surprise.

But a surprise did await the Spanish conquistadores in South America. In Bolivia at lake Titicaca they found Egyptian-looking reed boats and all over northern South America they found musicians playing in the pentatonic scale. In the Andes the local musicians played pentatonic panpipes and flutes. The stringed instrument was the charango, a sort of guitar/mandolin with a sound box made from the shell of an armadillo. Along with the panpipes there was a low pitched very long flute called senka tenkana (growing nose) that made the player stretch his arms. (To hear what Inca music sounded like, listen to “El Condor Pasa” by Los Incas, who also recorded as Urubamba.) Was the pentatonic scale carried to South America by ancient Egyptian sailors, or carried the other way? Apparently there was commerce between the regions because both tobacco and cocaine have been found in Egyptian mummies, and both originate in the Americas. There was apparently cross-cultural exchange in ancient times.

I find it odd that the Native peoples of North America were so musically undeveloped. Drums and flutes seem to be about it for their instruments, and often just the drums, accompanied by chanting. The music never made it up through Central America, apparently. Of course, depending on the date, much of today’s Central America was under water and migration largely impossible.

Humans like to make noise, and in many cultures unique musical traditions were developed. Will people of the distant future still listen to today’s music?

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About The Author: Bob Shell is a professional photographer, author and former editor in chief of Shutterbug Magazine. He is currently serving a 35 year sentence for involuntary manslaughter for the death of Marion Franklin, one of his former models. Shell was recently moved from Pocahontas State Correctional Center, Pocahontas, Virginia to River North Correctional Center 329 Dellbrook Lane Independence, VA 24348.  Mr. Shell continues to claim his innocence. He is serving the 11th year of his sentence. To read more letters from prison by Bob Shell, click here: http://tonywardstudio.com/blog/bob-shell-a-stitch-in-relative-time/

 

Posted in Affiliates, Blog, Engineering, Friends of TWS, History, Men, Music, Photography, Popular Culture