Category Archives: Glamour

Alexis Masino: Fashion is Genderless

 

Photography and Text by Alexis Masino, Copyright 2017

.

FASHION IS GENDERLESS

.

I chose to focus this editorial on something vital to the fashion industry which is often not used as a focal point: makeup. Makeup has traditionally been associated with femininity and up until recently, branded exclusively for women. Even now, most makeup advertising is geared toward women. The specific styles I crafted on the models (Phil Tedros, Andrew Mulson, Grace Bridy, and Brandon Texeira) were yellow eyeshadow, peach colored brows, electric blue cat eye, and dichromatic eyeshadow. I chose these trends for two reasons. My first idea was that I wanted to capture lots of bright colors, toying with the idea of femininity. But these trends also all made an appearance as popular trends among high fashion, used in shows and documented by brands like Vogue, in this past season. I noticed these trends were more commonly than not observed on women and the photographs paired with articles were almost entirely of female figures. To combat this stereotype I casted my models with the goal of role reversal, showing makeup trends mainly on male figures and with an aura of androgyny in place of femininity. I instructed the models to wear all black as to allow for complete focus on the makeup. The shoot took place in a studio for the sake of maintaining complete control over lighting and flash, specifically to properly capture the models’ faces up close and accentuate the proper hues of the makeup. Shooting at the ISO of 400 was a choice made after several test shots to minimize the warmth of the lights, but not reach too high of a number where grain would begin to appear in the photographs. The post-production editing involved reinforcing all these ideas in my vision by enhancing the colors and drowning out distractions.

.

Portrait_Alexis_Masino_UPenn_student

Portrait of Alexis Masino by Corey Fader, Copyright 2017

About The Author: Alexis Masino is a freshman enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2020.  To access additional articles by Alexis Masino, go herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/alexis-masino-los-detalles/

 

 

Also posted in Art, Blog, Current Events, Fashion, Men, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Student Life, Women

Justina McMinn: Self


.

 

Photography, Text and Video Interview by Justina McMinn, Copyright 2017

.

SELF

.

Self-love is dynamic. It is a concept talked about a lot today in our generation. Self-love is simply not just a state of feeling good. Self-love is a state of appreciation for one self that grows from the times you did not love or appreciate yourself. Self-love comes from the times you laid in bed and tormented yourself with thoughts like, “I’m not good enough” and “I don’t deserve it”. These moments of despair expand the self-love within us and we develop compassion for ourselves as human beings and accept our weaknesses as well as our strengths. It is not suppressing your weaknesses and only acknowledging your strengths. Rather, inviting both in with open and loving arms. Self-love isn’t something we can find in material things or other people. It is an internal project you can only engage in on your own.

Through these series of portraits, I aim to capture the real development of self-love and how up and down that process can look and feel. I wanted to capture the model in a nude state to demonstrate the vulnerability in finding comfort and contentment. She is reflecting and analyzing her experiences and feelings, good and bad. The process of unconditional self-love isn’t always glitter and gold, it takes forgiveness and trail and error. This series shows the despair, fulfillment, and happiness in the journey to loving yourself.

Inspired by The Guest House by Rumi:

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
As an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing,

and invite them in.

.

.

Victoria_Meng_Justina_Mirror_self

Portrait of Justina McMinn by Victoria Meng, Copyright 2017

.

About The Author: Justina McMinn is a Freshman enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2021.

Also posted in Art, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Erotica, Models, Nudes, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women

Rongrong Liu: Color and Accessory Empire

RONGRONG_LIU_STREET_fashion_photography_modern_lip_color_Asian_model_UPenn

Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

 

 

.

Photography and Text by Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017
.

COLOR AND ACCESSORY EMPIRE

.

In this series of street trend photos, colors and accessories are the main elements I observed and combined in this series of street fashion photographs.

First, color. Playing with color is a constant theme in fashion industry. The pastely color- blue, pink and purple has been in trend since last year, and most people apply it to clothing. I think it is a good try to combine it in beauty and accessories. Other than the pastely colors, I tend to use either black and white, which has a lot to do with the background and the shadow, or bright colors, which should be both simple and eye-catching. Good color styling highlights the outfit and bad color styling destroys it.

.

RONGRONG_LIU_STREET_fashion_photography_modern_blue_hat_Asian_student_UPenn

Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

.

Second, glasses. Last season, Gucci launched the “nerd chic” style. The inspiration of “The Nerdy Beauty” comes from that. The pearly hat and the bright blue color tries to add vigor to the style in order not to make the model a pure “nerd”.

.

RONGRONG_LIU_STREET_fashion_photography_modern_male_earrings

Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

.

Additionally, I see a strong trend for geometric glasses recently, which emphasizes a lot on the shape of the glasses. Therefore, some brands like Percy Lau breaks the traditional design, which a round or rectangular frame tightly holds the glasses, and deconstructs the geometry to give a new breath to the glasses. These elements are included in the sunglass and the plain glass I use for the models. Moreover, it is a heated trend to have jewelry design as part of the accessories, which I have the pearly hat and the glasses with some extra decoration.

.

RONGRONG_LIU_STREET_fashion_photography_modern_toe_nail_polish

Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

.

The last trend I want to illustrate is unisex, meaning man and woman sharing the same type of clothes. All the tops and accessories on the male model are from my own closet, and as we can see, the clothes are mostly pretty oversized-looking, but all fit perfectly on him. The gender boundary in styling is getting more and more ambiguous.

.

RONGRONG_LIU_STREET_fashion_photography_modern_CAMOUFLAGE

Photo: Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2017

.

Portrait of Rongrong Liu by Michael Heath, Copyright 2017

Portrait of Rongrong Liu by Michael Heath, Copyright 2017

.

About The Author: Rongrong Liu is a Junior enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2019

Also posted in Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Fashion, Models, Photography, Popular Culture

Noa Baker: Street Fashion


 

Photography and Text by Noa Baker, Copyright 2017

.

STREET FASHION

.

I’ve never felt so small-town in my life. I had “dressed up” for today, which meant grudgingly leaving my seven pairs of sweatpants in the bottom drawer and squeezing myself into the single pair of black jeans I own (when did I buy these? The seventh grade?), and swapping my regular pony tail with a less-regular pony tail. What was a suburban sweatshirt-dweller doing heading to New York City during fashion week, you might ask?

Great question. I was asking myself the same thing as I boarded the train, clutching multiple camera bags and tripping over my sneaker laces.

But to my utmost surprise, fashion week was everything—and more. It was seductive. Passionate. Fast paced and non-judgmental. I was expecting a bunch of super-thin tall blond super models and was instead faced with a deliciously diverse group of eclectic dressers. One model in hijab bustled past me, overlarge sunglasses pushed to her eyes and her runway pass to her face, a shield against the paparazzi. Afros are in this year—so many women had hair teased up to the sky that my pictures appear to have a fuzzy halo around the edges.

There was a faked shy-ness in the passers-by that I noticed, though. Many hid behind large sunglasses as they gazed stonily passed the paparazzies, or else glared into phone screens. The fashion on the streets became less about the clothes the pedestrian models were wearing than the persona—the iPhones, the headphones, the overlarge shades. As the day wore on, I became less interested in the outfits and more interested in the accessories that people hid behind. What makes the fashion, I wondered?   I tried to collect images that captured the persona of fashion week—the runway facial expressions hiding behind head accessories, the detached look of someone hurrying down the street and distracted by a phone call.

Is fashion only in what people wear?

.

About The Author: Noa Baker is a Sophomore enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2020

 

Also posted in Blog, Documentary, Environment, Fashion, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Women

Corey Fader: Observing the Trends at New York Fashion Week


.
 

Photography and Text by Corey Fader, Copyright 2017

.

OBSERVING THE TRENDS AT NEW YORK FASHION WEEK

.

In New York City every February and September there is one week dedicated solely to fashion. It is a time for clothing designers and models to show off the latest trends in the industry to potential buyers, media, and the public audience that lines the streets. This September I decided to make the trip to see up close the latest styles that are currently popular in our culture.

A trend that immediately stood out was the desire to wear vibrant pieces of clothing. Especially in the case of the women, the far majority of outfits were vivid with interesting color patterns and designs. In the situations where this was not the case, they most often had a flashy accessory in the form of a bright purse, reflective sunglasses, a gaudy hat, or anything of the like. Red in particular was heavily present in a large percentage of the overall outfits and accessories.

On a similar note, another prevalent fad was colorfully dyed hair, which was commonly observed for both men and women. Unlike many people who dye their hair regularly, the models participating in Fashion Week used colors that were totally unnatural. For example, green and purple were prominently featured throughout the week.

.

About the Author: Corey Fader is a Senior enrolled in the Wharton Business School, University of Pennsylvania. Class of 2018. To access additional articles by Corey Fader, go herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/corey-fader-excess/

 

Also posted in Blog, Documentary, Environment, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Student Life, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women