Category Archives: Travel

Alexis Masino: Los Detalles

 
.

 

Photography and Text by Alexis Masino, Copyright 2017

.

LOS DETALLES

.

Before this trip, I had never been outside the (continental) United States. Puerto Rico is a territory of the U.S., but it’s an entirely unique place on its own. There are stark differences between my city of residence and this island, but the contrasts lie primarily in the small details. Stepping off the plane, I was immediately overcome by the humidity (having left Philadelphia in the snow, my body was not quite prepared for such a change). The chatter of the people around was in Spanish, as were the signs and advertisements. Since there is a law against Ubers at the airport to protect the jobs of taxis we took a cab to our AirBnB, communicating directions with rough Spanish. When we arrived in Old San Juan it was dark, so there wasn’t much to be seen except the tight alleys and cobblestone roads. Several steep upward staircases later, I was in a beautifully modern yet antique home full of colors and open space.

The next morning, I was surprised by the views brought by the sunlight. From the balcony in the front of the house, I could see all the colors of the surrounding buildings and the bustle of people down on the streets. Never have I experienced a place with so much vibrancy and life, especially from the architecture but also from the people, even on a rainy day. From the back balcony, I could see a vast expanse of homes and shops, as well as one of the famous castles in the distance. There was always a constant chatter and buzz of people, no matter how early or how late at night, as well as a consistent hum of lively spanish music in the distance. I took an interest not only in the people, the architecture, and the buzz of life, but also in the lot of stray dogs and cats across the island.

This first day was spent exploring the city and local restaurants. I took a particular interest in the vendors and the native people. Living and working in a place heavily concentrated with and reliant on tourism, they are versed in interacting with people. A particular vendor noticed me taking a photo on the street and decided to pose with his hand under his chin, unknowingly perfecting the photo with his joke. Another vendor makes an appearance in the right corner of a photo, arms crossed with a serious gaze. In yet another photo, an ice cream vendor scoops sorbet into a cup for my friend.

At Condado Beach, the water is impossibly clear and the sand is warm but not sticky, a perfect place to take in the beauty of it all. My favorite photo here, again, is of a vendor pulling his cart across the length of the shore, tempting the patrons with ice cream. The next day, I hiked the El Yunque rainforest. It was cold and rained constantly (I ended up with the flu) so there are not many photos I particularly enjoy from this adventure. However, there is one inside the tower showing the view from three similar windows which I feel captures my entire experience in its simplicity.

Over the next few days, I visited two castles: Castillo de San Cristobal and Castillo San Felipe Del Morro. Again, I was captivated more by the simplistic details than anything: the colors, the patterns, the symmetry. I visited one on a rainy day and the other on a beautifully sunny day, which made for an even more stark contrast between the two and the ways in which they are portrayed in my photos. As the plane took off to head back to Philadelphia around sunset, the clouds lit up and the moon appeared above the wing of the plane as if to remind me that I was leaving the beautiful sunshine and vibrancy, allowing me to take it all in one last time.

.

About The Author: Alexis Masino is a freshman enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2020.  To access additional articles by Alexis Masino, go herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/alexis-masino-drugs/

 

Also posted in Architecture, Blog, Documentary, Environment, Popular Culture, Student Life, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women

Sidnie Burton: Breaking All the Rules

Tony_Ward_erotica_photography_model_Sidnie_Burton_K_Vaughn_scarves

Model: Sidnie Burton

Photography by Tony Ward, Copyright 2017.

.

Text by Sidnie Burton

.

BREAKING ALL THE RULES

.

Some say as you get older you should “act your age”…..dress your age, (age appropriate, etc.)  I’m a model, and in this “young” industry it can be hard to carve out a niche for yourself.  Sure their are age appropriate commercial print and catalog.  But what about fashion, lingerie and swimsuit modeling.  Something not too long ago was….should I say…Taboo!   Telling a particular client my age could be my undoing.  Even though I and others can still pull it off.  Shooting with Tony Ward has taught me a lot about “age appropriate”.  even a lot about myself.  And like Tony said “today’s older women are sexier and in better shape than some women half their age”.  Shooting on the beach of Atlantic City was exhilarating.  And in this particular case….swimsuit modeling,  was “breaking the rules” and stereotypes.  I for one praise the rule breakers in this competitive profession.  And plan to be that rule breaker myself.  If rules were never broken, and stereotypes kept ongoing in their dark place,  instead of being seen as an ancient closed minded way of thinking.  This shoot would, or could never have happened.  I hope to inspire and be testament to women of my age group to never give up on “Sexy”.   So here is to all the rule breakers, trailblazers, and to the photographers with the foresight to set that ball in motion.  Salute!

.

.

Credits:

.

Model: Sidnie Burton

Agency: Main Line Models & Talent

Bathing Suits: Victoria’s Secret

Jewelry: Betsy Johnson

Sandals: BCBG

Hats: Sun and Sand Headwear, Nine West

Location: Margate, New Jersey

Also posted in Art, Blog, Environment, Erotica, Fashion, Glamour, Models, Nudes, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Women

Racquel Ward: The 60’s Are Back

 

Photography and Text by Racquel Ward, Copyright 2017

.

THE 60’S ARE BACK

.

Washington D.C. expected 200,000 women and men to show up at the Women’s March last Saturday.  Los Angeles expected far less. However, as I approached Perishing Square in downtown LA, the site was truly unprecedented. I weaved through the crowd and sighted women with their shirts off, men carrying signs to support their wives, children with peace signs painted across their faces and a host of characters that used this occasion to dress up in their most eccentric outfits for the sake of self-expression. People chanted and raised their arms. Many were crying and laughing. Some were engaged in political debate. Kids climbed on street posts to get a better view of the stage, and the MC exhilarated the crowd with anti-Trump rhetoric. The sky lit up with a sea of posters – many were funny and all spoke to the need for social justice.

As a millennial, I hadn’t experienced this type of march since the Bush era. My friends and I in New York City would take to the streets to protest the war in Iraq. This march felt different. As a child, my parents schooled me on what it was like to grow up in the 60’s and how people started a cultural revolution through uninhibited marches and protests with no fear and a message of peace. This felt like that. The Women’s March was not about protesting against a war. It was about speaking out, in sheer numbers, across the country and the world, against a man who seeks to go backward for the sake of power and privilege instead of move forward for the benefit of mankind. The 750,000 people who showed up in downtown Los Angeles showed me that this is not a one-off march. This is the start of a cultural revolution. I am grateful to be part of it and to be counted as 750,001.

.

About The Author: Racquel Ward is a writer and educational therapist living in Los Angeles. She holds a BA in Culture and Media studies and a BFA in Contemporary Music from the New School University – Manhattan, New York. Racquel also holds a Master’s of Science in Teaching. She has been published on ThoughtCatalog and most recently finished her first children’s book.

Racquel_Ward_head_shot_photography_Tony_Ward_studio_selfie

Selfie by Racquel Ward, Los Angeles 2017.

.

To read additional articles by Racquel Ward, go here: http://thoughtcatalog.com/racquel-ward/2015/03/6-different-situations-when-you-must-ask-questions-to-get-what-you-want/

 

 

Also posted in Affiliates, Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Friends of TWS, News, Photography, Politics, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Women

Music in Philadelphia: People and Places

brian_schoenaeur_photography_philly_street_musicians_music_electric_factory_union_transfer_philadelphia

Philadelphia: Street Musician

 

Photography and Text by Brian Schoenauer, Copyright 2016

.

MUSIC IN PHILADELPHIA: PEOPLE AND PLACES

.

Philadelphia has a deep and storied musical history. At the crux of this rich history is a collection of historic venues. However, these venues are not just mere artifacts of history – these venues and the musicians who play inside them are what keep the music scene here in Philadelphia thriving. For this assignment, I wandered down Spring Gardens street to capture two of my favorite places to see in concert in the city. The Electric Factory originally opened in 1968 on the north side of Arch Street between 21st and 22nd. It was a converted tire warehouse that would house some of the greatest performers of the 20th century. When the original location was torn down in 1973 for the construction of condominiums, the Electric Factory relocated to 7th Street between Willow and Garden. The building itself still has a warehouse-like feel. With standing room only capacity of 3,000, it is an intimate venue to see everything from hip-hop to heavy metal. I got the chance to see one of my favorite bands, Foals, there a couple weeks ago. I also got the chance to be a part of my first crowd surf – a memory I won’t forget.

.

.

Union Transfer, located on 1026 Spring Garden Street, opened in 2011. However, the building itself has been around since 1889 when it was first used as a farmers market. Then in 1918 it was used as location to warehouse items in storage for the railway company. As I wandered towards the side of the building, I had the opportunity see the incredible mural on the side of the structure. I also got a chance to see the band that was playing there that night, Twin Peaks, unload their equipment off their truck.

As I continued to walk around the city, I had the opportunity to enjoy some music by street musicians. I was quickly reminded that music is everywhere – and that these historic venues weren’t the only place you could go to hear great music. Musicians with passion, soul, and determination were working to make a living on a frigid winter night. The energy of their music kept them focused and warm. And I felt lucky to be a part of the vibrant music culture that is Philly.

.

About The Author: Brian Schoenaeur is a senior enrolled in the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2017. Brian is also a running back on the Penn football team. To read additional articles by Brian Schoenaeur, go here: http://tonywardstudio.com/blog/brian-schoenauer-shaun-king-race-relations-america/

 

Also posted in Art, Blog, Documentary, Music, News, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life

Casey Egner: Ornament in the City

 

.

Photography and Artist Statement by Casey Egner, Copyright 2016

.

ORNAMENT IN THE CITY

.

This series of photographs documents an exploration of the streets of Philadelphia, largely shot in the Rittenhouse neighborhood it is a collection of moments found through a practice of flanerie. Using the idea of street ornament as a guide, I tried to focus on unique moments of intrigue and interest created either through an oddity in architecture or form. Walter Benjamin described the flanuer as a modern urban spectator. Here I am using the strategies of the flanuer to record discrete moments in the urban environment. Susan Sontag wrote in On Photography “The photographer is an armed version of the solitary walker reconnoitering, stalking, cruising the urban inferno, the voyeuristic stroller who discovers the city as a landscape of voluptuous extremes… The flâneur is not attracted to the city’s official realities but to its dark seamy corners, the neglected populations—an unofficial reality behind the façade of bourgeois life that the photographer ‘apprehends,’ as a detective apprehends a criminal.” 1973.

Somewhat separated from Sontag’s definition of flare as she discusses more of a documentary photography with the individual in mind, this project will exist as an ongoing series of walks taken through different neighborhoods in which I focus on peculiar moments in architecture and ornament within the city. Each walk will be taken with no destination in mind but only as a spectator, observing, sauntering, and strolling through the city.

.

About The Author: Casey Egner is a graduate student enrolled in the Master of Fine Arts, University of Pennsylvania. To read additional articles by Casey Egner, go here: http://tonywardstudio.com/blog/casey-egner-two-crowds-two-americas/

 

Also posted in Architecture, Art, Blog, Men, Photography, Student Life, UPenn Photography