Category Archives: Travel

Katie Kerl: You Don’t Have to Move on to Let Go


 

 

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Photography and Text by Katie Kerl, Copyright 2019

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You Don’t Have to Move on to Let Go

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Who would have thought I’d be quoting a Deadmau5/ Kaskade song at my age. Thirty five is slowly creeping up on me next month.

35.35?!?!  I’m supposed to have 2 kids, a husband, & the dog with the white picket fence right? 

Instead I’ll be celebrating my 35th at Miami music week. Yes, there are endless locations to pick for vacation. That’s just what I enjoy doing. It brings me inner peace.  Dancing my life away one week a year on my birthday, to some of the best house music you can find. Eating Cuban food and drinking Mojitoon the beach until my heart is content.  Sounds awful right? 

To some people that is actual torture. 

I’m sitting here a little high after a hot shower thinking, “What the fuck?” Taking the appropriate steps with someone in a relationship is what we dream about right? 

What happens when money and a dream of a different kind of life gets in the way? 

Believing in someone is one thing. Supporting their choices is another. Watching it change who they are is heartbreaking. Even if they don’t see it now, or do and will never admit it. Money with no meaning in is an empty feeling.

He said, “I wanted to give you everything.” I said, “All I wanted was you.”

In a world of fucked up dating, pretty vs. money, one would think finding someone who completely understands you would be ENOUGH

Think again. If you have to fight for the things you find important, and someone dismisses your concerns. It’s time to rip the bandage quickly. 

People do not change overnight ,or by accident. They change because something drastic happens. They change because they can’t go on living a lie. They change because the stressful world they live in has beaten them down. They change because life has become unmanageable. 

Finding yourself, and not letting go of who you are is just as important as chasing your dreams. I’ve mentioned it before; no one wants to feel dropped into someone else’s life and expected to act accordingly. Gold diggers want that. Not REAL women.

I never want to feel like I have to give up who I am , my hobbies , health , or views on family values for someone working themselves to death chasing money . 

Money won’t be there when you get sick, it’s not going to support you when you’re down, and it’s not going to make a home out of the house you live in. You’re supposed to grow as a couplelearn from each other,and accept problems as they arise,and address them together. 

If you are so busy taking care of everyone else around you that you forget to be good to yourself, of course you will feel mentally drained and used. A person’s presence will fill the room with joy, or it will suffocate you to the point you feel like you’re not going to make it up for air. 

Being single I feel completely free to be my ever weird self. If I let you in you’re special.  You’re adding to my happiness that took me so long to find. Once you start taking that away from me, I retreat and go back to doing exactly what makes me happy alone. 

Someone out there needed to hear this today. I know I did while typing it. I’m not quite sure if anyone is meant to be permanent in your life, or just come in and out to teach you lessons. 

To those who feel they cannot be alone. You truly become the person you are meant to be without any outside persuasion. If you’re stuck making that decision to stay or go, my grandmother always told me to list that person’s good and bad qualities, then make your decision based off that. 

Her system has yet to steer me wrong. I am going to continue to be myself. If I find that person to compliment my ever complicated life great! 

If not at least I am doing my best.

That’s more than enough for me. 

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Portrait of Katie Kerl by Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

Portrait of Katie Kerl by Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

 

About The AuthorKatie Kerl. Born 1984. Raised in Drexel Hill,  Pennsylvania. Attended Drexel University for Behavioral  Psychology .Occupation : commercial/ residential  design Philadelphia resident since 2011 . Hobbies include  : Foodie, whiskey drinker,  fitness , cooking  , tattoos , & house music lover . Instagram:  @kerl_up_with_kateTo access additional articles by Katie Kerl, click here: http://tonyward.com/katie-kerl-love-the-one-youre-with/

 

Also posted in Affiliates, Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, Health Care, News, Popular Culture, Women

Mikala Mikrut: Red

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Photo: Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

 

Text by Mikala Mikrut, Copyright 2019

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Photography by Tony Ward, Copyright 2019

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RED

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You said you liked red.

So I started seeing it everywhere:

The fabric on my couches,

The scratches you made when my chest was bare.

You said you liked red.

I’ve always loved the drive behind passion,

The power behind anger,

And its symbolism in fashion.

You said you liked red.

And blood became alluring,

Cherries suddenly voluptuous,

All my feelings of black, you were curing.

You said you liked red.

I want to be red for you.

Red from acts of affection,

From what my cheeks can’t hide when I speak too.

You said you liked red.

And it had to find me like the melody of a song,

My fire, my crazy opinions, and my desires.

You knew I was red all along.

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About The Author: Mikala Mikrut is a junior enrolled at Southern Utah University. To access additional articles by Mikala Mikrut, click here:http://tonywardstudio.com/blog/mikala-mikrut-sense-of-place/

 

Also posted in Accessories, Affiliates, Art, Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Erotica, Fashion, Film, Friends of TWS, Glamour, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Student Life, Women

Bob Shell: Why Radford?

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Bob Shell: Letters From Prison #35

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Letters  by Bob Shell, Copyright 2019

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Photography by Anthony Colagreco, Copyright 2019

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I have often been asked why I had my office/studio in Radford, VA, not exactly the center of culture..

In the mid 70s, after the near collapse of the US economy (caused by the infamous Arab oil embargo and other economic factors) wrecked my first camera shop, I worked for a year for Woolco Department Stores managing the camera department in one of their Roanoke stores. I didn’t like that job, because department managers didn’t really manage anything, and quit to take a job with Ritz camera in Blacksburg. When that didn’t work out (my selling style was to spend the time with the customer to find out what that person needed to buy to accomplish what they wanted to do, and sell them that. The regional manager said I was spending too much time with the customers!), I found myself working in the photo lab at Virginia Tech, where I’d gone to school. We developed and printed film shot by the two staff photographers, and when both of them were busy, I’d occasionally be asked to go out and shoot a “grip and grin” photo of the university President shaking hands with some visiting dignitary. But I wanted to be the photographer, not a lab rat in the basement, so after a year or so at this I left and took a job with Gentry Studio in Blacksburg. They were a combo of photo studio and camera shop, the perfect job for me.

I worked there for several years, honing my own photography skills in their studio after hours. I liked working there very much, but always had the itch to do my own thing. After all, even the best boss is still your boss, and I never liked working for other people. Gentry Studios had three locations, Salem, Blacksburg, and Radford, all long established. The owner decided to close the Radford studio, so I took the leap and took it over. I changed the sign to Shell Studio and expanded the camera shop portion. This, as I recall, was in 1980, and the rent on the large studio location was $ 300 a month! Amazing, eh? But at times I had trouble coming up with that money. I inherited the job of photographing the sororities at Radford University and some other school business, plus selling all the materials required for the photography courses. This, plus portraits and some commercial work kept me going for a while, but money was tight. To pick up some extra income I began writing for a relatively new photography publication initially called Shutterbug Ads, a buy-sell-swap newspaper for photographers. Initially there was not much editorial content, and that was often poor in quality, but the owner wanted to improve the quality and become more of a mainstream magazine. When I first wrote for them they were printed tabloid size on yellow paper, and writers were paid in copies.

Parallel to this I had started a photographic equipment import and distribution operation. I had almost accidentally stumbled upon Enna Werk, a small German optical company in Munich that had just lost its US distributor. So I began importing and wholesaling their products, primarily camera lenses, slide viewers, slide projectors, and the Ennascop opaque projectors. After a year I broadened my product lines to include Fisher tripods and video lights from Italy, COIL aspheric magnifiers from England, and Lamborghini camera bags and sunglasses. These additional product lines resulted from meeting people at photokina in 1980, which I also covered for Shutterbug. For ten years I ran this business in parallel to acting as Shutterbug’s Technical Editor. By 1990 it had become just too much to do all of this, so I sold the import/distribution business. Shutterbug had by then transitioned to being a real magazine with ever-growing subscription list, distribution to booksellers, grocery stores, Wal-Mart, etc., and they offered me the job as Editor at a payment rate I could live on. As I have said before, though, I was never an employee of Shutterbug. I contracted to supply editorial services at a fixed monthly rate. This allowed me the freedom to set my own office hours, stay away from office politics, and take on noncompeting projects, like writing books. By the late 80s I was writing several books a year as well as writing for Photo Industry Reporter and some other noncompeting publications. Since I could do my work from anywhere, I stayed on in the Radford studio location, at 202 Third Avenue, right in downtown Radford. I probably would have stayed there indefinitely, but the roof leaked and the landlord refused to fix it. After two studio floods my insurance company said they would not pay for any more water damage, so I was forced to move. Luckily a great location became available, a former pharmacy measuring about 35 X 80 feet at 239 West Main Street, just a short distance from the police department. I kept my studio there from 1992 until 2007, fifteen years. So I had studios in Radford, on major commercial streets, for 20+ years, but when the police came to my studio after Marion’s death the detectives said they didn’t know I was in town! Some detecting!!

I wanted a big studio space, and the new location was ideal, since I had begun conducting studio workshops for groups of photographers. The monthly rent there started at $ 500 a month, and by 2007 had only gone up to $ 525! And that included a reserved parking space right by the back door. The rent also included heat in the winter. Amazing, and one of the main reasons I stayed in Radford all those years.

Anyway, that’s the story of why I was in Radford, somewhat abridged. I’d probably still be there, doing my photography, writing for books, magazines and websites, and generally enjoying life if the police hadn’t foolishly blamed me for Marion’s death. Their simple-minded nonsense destroyed me at the peak of my career. The plain fact, never disputed by anyone, is that I was not even there when Marion overdosed. When I found her unconscious, I immediately called 911 and did everything in my power to help her.

The real reason the Radford police, prosecutors, and court felt they had to destroy me was that some of my photography was frankly erotic (many Americans are terrified of open sexuality), and at the time of Marion’s death we were working on a book of erotica for a German publisher. The book was ultimately published as Erotic Bondage: Art of Rope by Goliath, first in their MixOfPix series. There is nothing pornographic about this book; no penetration, the photos are no more revealing than Playboy and far less revealing than Penthouse. We even Photoshopped some photos because we wanted to sell the book in most countries of the world, and put the text in English, German, French, and Spanish, for that reason as well. The book was published under my pseudonym Edward Lee, a pseudonym I’d used often since at least1993 (I don’t really remember when I first used it; it’s actually my two middle names. Over the course of my career I’ve used a number of pseudonyms for a variety of reasons. Many writers have done so. My friend Don Sutherland used something like 16 or 17 different pseudonyms.)

At my trial the prosecutor waved a copy of the book around at every opportunity, shoving it at my witnesses’ faces – “Have you seen THIS?”. He always seemed surprised when they answered, “Yes, Bob gave me a copy.” He was offended that they weren’t offended! None of my friends and former models found the book objectionable.

I just managed to keep my business going doing the 4+ years I was out on bail awaiting trial. I wrote four books, numerous magazine articles, held workshops, had a gallery show of my photographs in Chicago (but couldn’t go to it!), did my own photography, and generally tried to live a normal life during that time. But the prosecution was determined to convict me, and used false evidence and practically every other dirty trick in the book to. convince the jury that I was a scumbag who regularly drugged and raped my models, even though they couldn’t locate a single former model with anything negative to say about me. Not a one! And they looked for more than four years. As a lawyer I know said, if that had been true, surely someone would have come forward.

I’m almost tired of repeating that I am a totally innocent man destroyed by a corrupt political system because I dared to be different. They sentenced me to 32 1/2 years, when the Virginia sentencing guidelines recommended a maximum sentence of three years! The Virginia Dept. of Corrections classifies me as a “numerical lifer,” which means that even though I don’t have a life sentence I’m unlikely to live long enough to get out. That’s really depressing!

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About The Author: Bob Shell is a professional photographer, author and former editor in chief of Shutterbug Magazine. He is currently serving a 35 year sentence for involuntary manslaughter for the death of Marion Franklin, one of his former models. Shell was recently moved from Pocahontas State Correctional Center, Pocahontas, Virginia to River North Correctional Center 329 Dellbrook Lane Independence, VA 24348.  Mr. Shell continues to claim his innocence. He is serving the 11th year of his sentence. To read more letters from prison by Bob Shell, click here: http://tonyward.com/bob-shell-wherefore-blog/

 

Also posted in Affiliates, Architecture, Blog, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, Photography, Popular Culture

Jamie Hunter: Escuela Adelante – Nicaragua

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Text by Jamie Hunter, Copyright 2019

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ESCUELA ADELANTE

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Who are we?

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Escuela Adelante provides high quality, alternative education in Spanish and English to meet the diverse needs of San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. We offer bilingual preschool, several levels of STEM-based ESL and bilingual coursework for elementary-aged students, and adult ESL classes. All of our programming is founded in our core concepts of Accessibility, Diversity, and Academic Excellence. We have been serving the community since 2014 and plan to expand to full-time bilingual primary and secondary school, including technical training, college preparation, and extracurricular academic courses. Escuela Adelante is a non-profit organization, registered as a 501c(3) in the United States.

Our Mission:

Our mission is to inspire learning and bring communities together by providing outstanding bilingual education that embraces and depends on socioeconomic, linguistic and cultural diversity. 

Our Vision:

We strive to cultivate generations of bilingual critical thinkers who are highly knowledgeable, technologically adept, individually inspired, kind and respectful towards others and towards the physical environment. We envision a thriving, dynamic campus where students can grow and explore. We embrace diversity, self-empowerment and cultural exchange as a means of maximizing education and nurturing healthy relationships between all people of San Juan del Sur and beyond.

Our Promise:

We promise a safe environment where each child can gain the skills for his or her unique path, whether that path leads to university, entrepreneurship, or other success. All students are treated with equal respect and love, regardless of race, gender, religion, socio-economic status, or other individual differences. We respect and embrace everyone’s native language and culture.

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Jamie Hunter teacher educator escuela adelante

Jamie Hunter

About The Instructor

Jaime Hunter, Co-Founder & Director of Operations 

Jaime is a language instructor with 13 years of teaching experience, ranging from Montessori preschool to the university level. She received her Master’s degree in Teaching English as a Second Language and Educational Linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania, and holds Bachelor’s degrees in English and Spanish from Temple University. Jaime previously served as the Director of Operations at the Barrio Planta Project in San Juan del Sur, and instructed at the Polytechnic University in Rivas, Nicaragua, as well as with the Biblioteca Movil and the Casa de la Mujer in San Juan del Sur. 

 

Also posted in Announcements, Blog, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, News, Popular Culture, Science, Student Life, Women

Katie Kerl: Philadelphia Foodgasim

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Photography and Text by Katie Kerl, Copyright 2018

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Philadelphia Foodgasim

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Two things I love about Philadelphia are the amazing restaurants and historic architecture. I’ve lived in the city for quite some time now. Being a major foodie I had to let you in on a few of my favorites. Some on the top 50 list , and others that you’d have to search off the beaten path to find . Being that I love cooking it’s a great hobby for inspiration. 

Philly is known for its boutique dining experiences. I usually categorize my favorites by section of the city. Some of the major names in food that stick out in my mind are:

Michael Solomnov. He is a pioneer of Israel’s most authentic food in Philadelphia. Zahav located in Society Hill,  is on the essential 38 restaurants list in the country . Their tasting menu is my personal favorite, and the food goes on for days. One bite better than the next, and leaves you with the happiest of foodgasms. If that were to be my last meal I’d be more than ok with it. We worked with him at Mr. Bar Stool for the seating in the restaurant. Often booked on the weekends, you can slide into the bar mid week and get full service . His other venues include Goldie, Federal donuts, Percy Street Barbecue, Abe Fisher,and Dizengoff  . You cannot choose a bad one. His cookbook is on display in all of his restaurants. It is a must have for the at home Chef. His back story has to be one of my favorites as well .A recovered addict, an immigrant to this country, turned restaurant mogul. That’s an amazing feat. 

That takes me to Stephen Starr. Everyone knows his name and conglomerate of restaurants he owns in the city. Parc Rittenhouse is the best people watching spot in my opinion, and a brunch staple in Philadelphia. The outside seating overlooking Rittenhouse Park is just gorgeous. The service is great, and a fresh bread basket that will make you forget you just gave up carbs.

Then there is the amazing female duo Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran. They own Lolita, Jamonera, Barbuzzo, Bud & Marilyn’s, and Little Nonna’s, two boutiques (Open House and Verde) which I get a lot of my gifts at. Of them all Lolita is my favorite. I remember when they used to be a BYO tequila place with fresh mixers before they got their liquor license. After their remodel the food is just as amazing and the cocktails always keep me coming back. 

Ardiente is a new spot on my list. Just a few blocks from my work on second street. I had the pleasure of working with Michael Sciore for some of the seating. He also owns Philly’s Latin radio station known as La Mega. He brought a touch of Miami flavor to Philly with the all white interior seating against gorgeous stained glass, amazing food/ drinks, peep shows in the bathrooms, and the pastry chef from the old Le Bec Fin. Be sure to try the stamp collector cocktail when you go it’s my favorite yet lethal!

Pine Fish situated in the Gayborhood has a bohemian Moroccan vibe on the inside to die for. They do an amazing happy hour 7 days a week that is hard to compete with. It has a neighborhood clientele , and quite a few regulars that will absolutely humor you while snacking on 1$ oysters and sipping champagne.  

In old city, Tuna Bar recently opened in 2018. Owner Ken Sze and his wife are the nicest people. The lunch specials are great, beautiful cocktails, and tasting menu. They won the Best of restaurant design award in Philly Magazine. Mr. Bar Stool also did the seating for Ken. The live edge sushi bar is my favorite part of the interior. It is a very sexy welcoming atmosphere. Kens wife also owns the Geisha House on 3rd street. If you are in need a perfect weekend outfit that is the place to go.

I have lived in Queen Village for over a year and always overlooked going into the Morning Glory Diner. After seeing the giant mural above it, I had to check it out. They are a cash only diner and have the best pancakes, and I’m not really a pancake person. The portions are huge totally shareable and the staff is so nice! Be sure to try the homemade lemonade.

Barcelona Bar on Passyunk square is the place to go if you love red sangria and tapas. It sits a little further down from the fountain, but well worth the walk. The outside has one of my favorite quotes “I can resist anything but temptation “. – Oscar Wild. 

Now, Fond and Noord also sit on Passyunk Square. The owners also together own the breakfast spot The Dutch. All three drool worthy. Fond is my second favorite tasting menu restaurant in the city . Fantastic complex cocktails, friendly staff , and diverse food depending on how adventurous you are . Noord is a BYOB to die for overlooking the fountain. I could sit there all afternoon in the summer. 

Devon Seafood has the most amazing happy hour and again overlooks Rittenhouse Park. Sit sipping your wine people watching. Try the mini lobster rolls, mussels , and lobster Mac and cheese . Another secret, Sunday’s they do half price bottles of wine 100$ and under, perfect spot for Sunday funday adventures. 

I’m also very into Asian soups and two of my favorite spots are DanDan Rittenhouse which has an amazing spicy beef noodle soup. At Cheu Rittenhouse I’ve yet to pick a bad item on the menu. They also have a cool vibe with graffiti walls and welcoming staff. Nam Phoung is my go to pho spot on Washington Avenue. Ask for the #159 you will thank me later. 

If you’re taking a trip to Philly in the near future I hope a few of these have sparked your interest. To me food is love. Leaving a restaurant feeling full from food that was beautifully prepared creates lasting memories, and obvious reasons to go back.

Thank you to all the hard working innovative chefs in this city. 

Now where to try next? 

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About The AuthorKatie Kerl. Born 1984. Raised in Drexel Hill,  Pennsylvania. Attended Drexel University for Behavioral  Psychology .Occupation : commercial/ residential  design Philadelphia resident since 2011 . Hobbies include  : Foodie, whiskey drinker,  fitness , cooking  , tattoos , & house music lover . Instagram:  @beatz_eatz_n_freaks .To access additional articles by Katie Kerl, click here: http://tonywardstudio.com/?p=17776&preview=true

 

Also posted in Affiliates, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, News, Popular Culture, Women