Category Archives: UPenn: Photography Students

Rongrong Liu: A Macro View of Utensils

 

Photography, Text and Video by Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2018

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A Macro View of Utensils

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As a foodie for years, my approach to this still life assignment started with the thought of taking pictures of food settings. However, an insufficiency of tableware at home, I shifted my focus to emphasize the auxiliary but inseparable tools, utensils.

Sometimes under the lightsource, the highlight on the edges of spoons can cast a shiny half-eclipse reflection on the table so beautifully that I decided to utilize the reflective property of metals. I began with a single spoon and fork with a black background, but the lonely shadow turned out to be dull, hence I added more and more of them until they  overlapped.  Under the macro lense, with an f-stop at 2.8, the utensils have an abstract look.  It is my first attempt at macro lens photography, and it is the first time I realized the life philosophy “how things look depend on how you look at it” can apply to this series, literally.  The abstraction attracted me so much, that I made use of this look to shoot knives and a kitchen strainer.  At first glance, it might be hard to see what they are, but once I added a title to the series, the riddle was solved.

I hardly ever took any still life pictures before because I used to think still life is still, everyone at the same spot I am standing can take exactly the same photo, but the one thing I missed is composition. It is true that you can frame a photo with the same still objects, but these ordinary objects that we take for granted can be more than interesting if you actually look “into” them. How things look depend on how you look at it. It’s all about a point of view.

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About The Author: Rongrong Liu is a Junior enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2019. To access additional articles by Rongrong Liu, click herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/rongrong-liu-looking-at-photographs/

 

Also posted in Accessories, Art, Blog, Cameras, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, Photography, Student Life, UPenn, Video, Women

Anisha Arora: Shoes

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Photo: Anisha Arora, Copyright 2018

 

Photography and Text by Anisha Arora, Copyright 2018

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BOOK REVIEW

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JOHN SZARKOWSKI: LOOKING AT PHOTOGRAPHS

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SHOES

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When talking about Lewis W. Hine, one of the photographers included in the book, the author writes that “he conceived of the medium as a means of studying and describing the social conditions around him”. That is also how I aim to use the art of photography- to bring to light difficult truths that we often want to forget.

What I found truly intriguing while reading the book was the variations between photographers. Variations in their purpose/objective behind photography, as well as, variations in what they found worth capturing on camera. While some find fashion photography to be their calling, some find it interesting to capture the mundane routines of common people. Among all the photographers, I could most relate to Lewis W. Hine.

Hine wanted to use photography to drive social change, and his pictures were a celebration of people who had nerve, skill, muscle, and tenacity. He captured the common people. That’s what I want to achieve through my photographs. His picture of little children on the streets, reminded me of a picture (attached as a jpeg) I happened to click while walking on a street in Ethiopia in the town of Harar. The picture is of a small 7-8 year-old boy splashing water over his face to cool down in the terrible heat. This water is generally used to clean people’s shoes. This boy, like many other 5-12 year-old boys, is a “shoe-shine” boy. These children leave their homes in Ethiopia’s rural areas to work in the big cities as shoe-polishers. They stay in deplorable living conditions, often beg for food and money, have never seen a school classroom and are most likely physically and sexually exploited. They save a part of their meagre incomes to support their families back in the rural areas, who make next to nothing from agriculture. What I find beautiful about this picture is that the boy seems so happy splashing the water on his face. This is normal life for him- he has forgotten his miseries and adapted to life on the streets.

I lived in Ethiopia for a year before school, working with the Ministry of Agriculture and Prime Minister’s Office on strategy and policy projects aimed at improving incomes of smallholder farmers. I’m hoping that some of my organization’s projects can raise agricultural incomes, so that more children don’t have to leave their families and can have a normal childhood.

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About The Author: Anisha Arora is enrolled in the Graduate program, Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania. To access additional articles by Anisha Arora, click herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/anisha-arora-roller-coaster/

 

Also posted in Blog, Book Reviews, Current Events, Documentary, Environment, Health Care, History, News, Photography, Politics, Travel, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women

I Wear: Tony Ward Erotica

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I Wear Tony Ward Erotica

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To browse the Store or make a purchase, click herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/store/t-shirts/

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About The Model: Summer Thompkins is from Philadelphia, a 21 year old model, writer, feminist, and new contributor to Tony Ward Studio. To see additional pictures of Summer, click herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/summer-thompkins-men-are-a-joke/

 

 

Also posted in Accessories, Art, Blog, Documentary, Erotica, Fashion, Gifts, Glamour, Models, Photography, Popular Culture, Portraiture, Student Life, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women

Eileen Ko: A Work of Heart

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Photography, Text and Video by Eileen Ko, Copyright 2018

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A WORK OF HEART

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When I was thinking of a theme for this assignment, I wanted to take photographs of things I see and work with every day but do not take the time to really pay attention and consider their value. In addition, I wanted to photograph things that not everyone is familiar with– things that are common to me but not to all students. This was how I came to decide to focus my theme on medical supplies. My desire is to give my viewers an idea of what nursing is and how nursing students use these medical supplies during clinical to provide care to our patients.

According to the American Nurses Association, nursing is the “protection, promotion, and optimization of health” and the “facilitation of healing, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response.” In order to carry out this role, we need specific and proper instruments to help us provide care and obtain health information. I wanted to introduce the materials that I wear and use that give me a sense of identity and responsibility I have in influencing the patients’ health and ultimately their lives. For example, my hospital ID’s represent my identity, role, and devotion as a nursing student and future nurse to optimize my clinical experiences to improve my skills in providing competent care. Additionally, my watch explains that time is a critical factor in patient care. Every second is crucial. Every second precious. Every second requires us to never lose our edge and be on focus.

When I walk into the hospital twice a week for clinical, I experience the intense and various range of emotions. Joy in the successful birth of a newborn. Distressing emotions such as despair, fear, pain, discomfort, and frustration. To represent this wide range of emotions, I photographed some of the images against a black background to symbolize gloom and darkness. I photographed the rest of the images in bright light against a white background to depict happiness. I also added flower petals and leaves to symbolize the relentless hope that patients and families have in their desire for recovery.

Setting up the items in a particular way and the use of light were incorporated in the images. Each photograph required altering the lightings and editing the brightness and contrast to convey the various emotions attached to nursing, how we use equipment, and patient experiences.

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About The Author: Eileen Ko is a Nursing student in her junior year at the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2019. To access additional articles by Eileen Ko, click herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/eileen-ko-beauty-ordinary/

 

Also posted in Blog, Documentary, Environment, Health Care, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life, UPenn, UPenn Photography, Women

Mu Qiao: What is Love?

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Photography, Text and Video by Mu Qiao, Copyright 2018

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WHAT IS LOVE?

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Each of us has different answers. In my opinion, love is more of a factor in the details of our lives than in the case of making pledges. Our life is inseparable from the material, also the expression of love. In love, we often use a variety of small gifts to express the emotion for each other, different items appear in different occasions, carrying different meanings. Then, that item will appear in our usual life scene for a long time, reminding us of those special moments and spaces.

There are also a variety of small gifts between me and my girlfriend, and then these little gifts are scattered in every corner of our room, such as sofas, tables, beds and even ceilings. Over time, these small gifts that have come into my life at specific times gradually become integrated into the environment and form an integral part of my room. Whenever I see them, I will remember specific sweet moment. These meaningful objects appear particularly interesting and vivid in a small space. However, at the same time, we may always neglect the existence of these objects, forget to recall the happiness of life, and be trapped in the endless vortex of working and studying.

So, I intend to record those gifts at home. Although each of them is static, it always invites people to think of dynamic scenes of life. Dolls on the couch, piggy bank on the desk, toy dog ​​on the bed, flowers on the dining-table, Polaroid on the small end table, balloons on the ceiling, jewelery cups on the coffee table, and champagne glasses and candles in the cupboard. Each of them was separated from things nearby, highlighted under the spotlight, and presented in the center of our sight. In this way, the individual meaning of each gift has been emphasized, these special memories have been retrieved.

Love exists in loving and memorizing.

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About The Author: Mu Qiao is a Graduate student enrolled in the School of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania. To access additional articles by Mu Qiao, click herehttp://tonywardstudio.com/blog/mu-qiao-builder/

 

Also posted in Accessories, Architecture, Documentary, Environment, Men, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life, UPenn, UPenn Photography