• Elizabeth Southward: I Love Your Mind

    Elizabeth Southward

    Posted on January 27, 2012 by Elizabeth Southward

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    ……….As I was going through my wardrobe in anticipation of the sitting with TW, an overwhelming feeling of anxiety came over me. I was born and raised in a catholic environment with fairly conservative parents. I wondered how my family would react to a compilation of eroticism and fashion. Modeling had only become a recent passion of mine. I have participated in shoots ranging from avant-garde to beauty, but I never agreed to the nudity genre. To this day, I have conformed to my far from liberal background. Ultimately, I was intimidated by Tony’s visions.

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    Elizabeth Southward

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    Don’t get me wrong, I have always admired TW’s work and his eye for beauty—I just could never envision myself in any of his models’ shoes. I knew one of the models he had previously collaborated with, who seemed so in tune with her body and sexuality. He reminded me of a fatherly figure who had an innate passion for art and enormous love for the female body. Both key traits I admire.

    Copyright 2012

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    About The Author: Elizabeth Southward currently studies English at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She hopes to pursue the field of Public Relations upon her graduation. She sought out modeling at the end of May 2011, and currently spends her free time partaking in shoots. She was signed to Reinhard Agency in Philadelphia in August of 2011. She hopes to continue modeling full-time upon graduation and model internationally.
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    Her interests include volunteering at the Camden County Animal Shelter in Blackwood, NJ. She specifically nurtures felines in preparation for adoption. Other interests include: tutoring elementary age children, fashion, reading the classics, baking, traveling, and attending cultural events in the Philadelphia area.


  • Elizabeth Southward: Gender Ambiguity – Part 2

    Elizabeth Southward

    Posted on January 18, 2012 by Elizabeth Southward

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    ……….Gender discrimination is revealed through the transformation of a male to a female. Orlando is brought up in an aristocratic society and is exposed to famous philosophers and poets like Nicholas Greene. Orlando has the capability to choose a woman and ability to be an ambassador to Constantinople as well. Orlando has the capability to compose poems and express himself through writing. Orlando has the upper hand in society as a male in society, but even if he were of the middle class he would still be in the same position. Orlando’s transformation shocks, yet excites the town, especially with the trumpets blaring. In effect Woolf hypothesizes what would happen in society if she were to come out as well as demonstrates her own hesitations with her true nature. A critic named Toni A. H. McNaron focuses on Woolf’s homosexuality within her article A Lesbian Reading when she claims, “The whole question of identification became central to my evolving connection with Virginia about seventeen years ago” (McNaron 15). McNaron characterizes Woolf’s sexuality as a way of characterization. Woolf demonstrates the transformation of Orlando as her own attempt to express empowerment with women.

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    Elizabeth Southward

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    Orlando realizes once he is a woman that she does not have the advantages she once did. Orlando attempts to reconcile her writing ability and does so successively. She travels with a tribe of gypsies and Orlando recognizes the separation between the socio-economic classes. Men from the tribe observe her intellect and as a reaction plot her murder. In Woolf’s excerpt, she illustrated men’s disapproval of women’s discernment, when she clarifies, “…There was an enormous body of masculine opinion to the effect that nothing could be expected of women intellectually. Even if her father did not read out loud these opinions, any girl could read them for herself; and the reading, even in the nineteenth century, must have lowered her vitality, and told profoundly upon her work” (Woolf 54). Men’s opinion of women’s discernment was extreme disgust and denied women’s capability of intellectual expression. Woolf stresses the major disadvantage of women and subservience in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Orlando is a prime example of Woolf’s contempt with societal standards in the eighteenth century and difficulty with her own sexual desires.

    Copyright 2012

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    About The Author: Elizabeth Southward currently studies English at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She hopes to pursue the field of Public Relations upon her graduation. She sought out modeling at the end of May 2011, and currently spends her free time partaking in shoots. She was signed to Reinhard Agency in Philadelphia in August of 2011. She hopes to continue modeling full-time upon graduation and model internationally.
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    Her interests include volunteering at the Camden County Animal Shelter in Blackwood, NJ. She specifically nurtures felines in preparation for adoption. Other interests include: tutoring elementary age children, fashion, reading the classics, baking, traveling, and attending cultural events in the Philadelphia area.


  • Readings: Gender Ambituity – Part 1

    Elizabeth Southward

    Posted on January 15th, 2012 by Elizabeth Southward

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    Virginia Woolf is ambiguous with her definition of the genders. In the beginning of the novel, Orlando’s gender is skewed and she sets readers up for confusion. Woolf portrays Orlando to be partially feminine when she states, “But, alas, that these catalogues of youthful beauty cannot end without mentioning forehead and eyes” (Woolf 12). Rarely is a male described as being beautiful – a male is praised for her masculinity or for his chiseled jaw. Woolf though adds a sentiment of feminity to Orlando’s character. He is known for his shapely legs, another feminine attribute. Through Woolf’s female touch she better explains her sexuality and underlying hardships. She uses Orlando as a way of expressing her own difficulty with coming out. Woolf is affected by her own hidden sexuality, but she opts to set the novel in the Elizabethan time period, a time of limited expression for women.

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    Elizabeth Southward

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    ……….During the Elizabethan time period women were unable to express themselves through writing or to hold their own opinions without criticism. Women had to depend on men, whether they had a choice or not. In the excerpt of Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own, she exemplifies women’s lack of independence, “She had no chance of learning grammar and logic, let alone of reading Horace and Virgil. She picked up a book now and then, one of her brother’s perhaps, and read a few pages. But then her parents came in and told her to mend the stockings or mind the stew and not moon about with books and papers” (Woolf 47). Women were at a major disadvantage in comparison to men. Men were able to receive education and women were domesticated to house chores. Parents reinforced the inferiority of women by forcing them into the kitchen. In relation to Orlando, Woolf works backwards to demonstrate gender discrimination

    Copyright 2012

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    About The Author: Elizabeth Southward currently studies English at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She hopes to pursue the field of Public Relations upon her graduation. She sought out modeling at the end of May 2011, and currently spends her free time partaking in shoots. She was signed to Reinhard Agency in Philadelphia in August of 2011. She hopes to continue modeling full-time upon graduation and model internationally.
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    Her interests include volunteering at the Camden County Animal Shelter in Blackwood, NJ. She specifically nurtures felines in preparation for adoption. Other interests include: tutoring elementary age children, fashion, reading the classics, baking, traveling, and attending cultural events in the Philadelphia area.


  • Readings: Gender Gap and the Reprecussions of Disguise

    Elizabeth Southward

    Posted on January 12, 2012 by Elizabeth Southward

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    How can women gain an upper hand with the eighteenth century limitations and man’s superiority in society? In the two texts, Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe and Fantomina by Eliza Haywood, one protagonist connives their way to fulfill empty vanity whereas the other manipulates for financial satisfaction. Moll, the protagonist from Moll Flanders discovers her independence from the exchange of sexual favors for monetary value and eventually begins a career in thieving when she reaches middle age. Moll is on the low end of the totem pole. Fantomina who is considered aristocratic is intrigued by the idea of prostitution in order to win over an unreliable suitor. Each protagonist views the manipulation of man as the starting point of feminism. Although both women seize control by the means if manipulation only Moll attains true satisfaction, whereas Fantomina does not.

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    Elizabeth Southward

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    Throughout the course of each novella and novel the usage of disguise is crucial to each character’s means of control. Fantomina is first intrigued by a prostitute, which spurs her many disguises. Fantomina can envision herself consuming attention that this particular prostitute receives. Ultimately she decides to dress down for acknowledgement.

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    Copyright 2012

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    About The Author: Elizabeth Southward currently studies English at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She hopes to pursue the field of Public Relations upon her graduation. She sought out modeling at the end of May 2011, and currently spends her free time partaking in shoots. She was signed to Reinhard Agency in Philadelphia in August of 2011. She hopes to continue modeling full-time upon graduation and model internationally.

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    Her interests include volunteering at the Camden County Animal Shelter in Blackwood, NJ. She specifically nurtures felines in preparation for adoption. Other interests include: tutoring elementary age children, fashion, reading the classics, baking, traveling, and attending cultural events in the Philadelphia area.


  • Anna: At The Plaza Hotel, Part 2

    Fashion By Shawn Pinckney

    Posted on February 11, 2011

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    ……….Anna tried on the last dress Shawn Pinckney designed. A black sheer tight fitting piece – made the ensemble erotic and classy . It looked great on her tall lean body – so I clicked away and secured the record of the moment. After the shoot we walked around the corner to Columbus Circle looking for a chic place to enjoy dinner. Heads turned as we entered an establishment recommended by the concierge at the Plaza.

    Anna With Sheer Lace

    As soon as we entered New York’s trendiest place, heads turned in the direction of Anna. We were quickly escorted over to a well located table. Just a few moments later – then governor of New York, Elliot Spitzer entered the room and like everyone else…..gazed pro’vocatively at the TWS model.


  • Anna: At The Plaza Hotel

    Anna With Mask

    Posted on February 10, 2011

    ………It was getting late. Anna and I had been shooting for several hours at the luxurious Plaza Hotel in New York. There were just a few more outfits to photograph in order to complete the set of fashion pictures. As we were wrapping up – we discussed going to the bar on the ground floor of the swanky hotel for drinks before we went out on the town for an enjoyable meal, after an afternoon at play. I looked at the notes from the prop stylist – reminding me to shoot her with the mask.


  • Picture Of The Day: September 27, 2010

    Neiman Marcus Lingerie


  • Tony Ward: Recent Work For German Cosmopolitan

    In Celebration Of Cosmo's 30th Year In Publishing

    ……….October 2010 will mark the 30th year of publishing for German Cosmopolitan magazine. I was asked by editor in chief, Petra Winter to create a new portfolio of images to be published in a special Sex and Art edition, the first of its kind in the publications history. It is with great pleasure that I celebrate these images with you.

    Sex And Art

    Sex And Art

    Sex And Art

    Sex And Art

    Sex And Art

    Sex And Art

    Sex And Art

    Sex And Art


  • German Cosmopolitan: 30th Anniversary Issue

    Sex And Art Special Edition: October 2010

    …….TW will be posting his recent work for this special anniversary issue coming soon!


  • Picture Of The Day: August 30, 2010

    Neiman Marcus Lingerie