Category Archives: Haverford College

Kenneth Taylor: Film is Definitely Back

New York Camera & Video

 

Text by Kenneth Taylor, Copyright 2021

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Film is Definitely Back

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Some say the return to film is a reaction to a world where everything has become digital, fast and easy. It is certainly true that shooting film requires you to slow down and this makes it a very enjoyable experience.  Perhaps the reason is even more simple than that. The main reason for the resurgence of film may simply be because it’s beautiful.  That’s what got me hooked.

At New York Camera & Video we’re seeing our film lab get filled with orders on a daily basis. It’s all types of orders too.  Color, black & white disposable cameras, even slide film.  We also sell film cameras and many don’t last on the shelves for more than a day.  There’s also an increasing level of connoisseurship for it.  Many customers know which cameras and lenses are of quality ore even collectible. They can speak in great detail about the differences between film stocks. This has a lot to do passion film seems to bring out in people and the vast amount of knowledge now available on the internet.  We’re seeing customers of all ages. In fact, our older customers are shocked when I tell them our largest demographic of film shooters is roughly between the ages of 18-30.

Our film connoisseurs are a joy to speak with.  However, the most enjoyable aspect of my job is helping someone who wants to get into film for the first time.  They usually start out with something simple like a point and shoot camera. Within a few months after they’ve had some decent results they’re back in the store asking about trading up for a fully manual 35mm camera. Many even take it a step further and get into larger format film cameras. It’s thrilling to see their knowledge expand and the quality of their images progress over time.  It’s  not long until they’re coming in and giving us tips and pointers.

This isn’t just a fad like when fashion from a past decade briefly makes a comeback.  The apps on our phones like Instagram have been trying to emulate film for years.  The look of film never stopped being beautiful.  Kodak and most of the other film manufacturers are doing so well that they’re figured out ways to resurrect discontinued films back to market.

More are on the horizon in the next year or so.  That’s not a venture a company would take on for a fad.  Even our professional digital photographers are beginning to add film to their wedding and portraiture packages.  They tell us their customers are beginning to request it.  Nothing beats the soft look of skin tones shot on film.  We now have to process color film every single day to keep up with volume and we’re constantly getting new regular customers.  If you’re interested in dusting off your old film camera and getting back into it or perhaps trying it for the first time, stop by our store.  We have everything to get you started.  A knowledgeable staff, cameras, hard-to-find batteries, developing, printing, even home processing materials.

About The Author:  Kenneth Taylor is a professional photographer and employee of New York Camera & Video.  To visit his website, click herehttps://www.expoterrestrial.com

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Editor’s Note: New York Camera & Video address: 1139 Street Road. Southampton, Pa. 18966.  Phone: 215-357-6222

Also posted in Affiliates, Blog, Cameras, commentary, Current Events, Film, Friends of TWS, History, Media, News, Photography, Popular Culture, Science

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Emily Williams: Home/Solitude

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Photography and Text by Emily Williams, Copyright 2020

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HOME/SOLITUDE

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I dedicate this series to my grandfather, Leon Williams.

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Driven by my frustration with the passage of time without a singular place to call home, I started to think about the meaning of home—a feeling rather than a physical space. A feeling that I chased, both literally and figuratively, while running countless miles on roads both familiar and unfamiliar. Listening to the sound of my own feet, in part, lead me to this series.

As the series grew, it started to center around solitude, the feeling I always circle back to when meditating on home. I wanted to explore the range of emotions contained in solitude—from loneliness, to peace, to anger. I aim to create visual representations of quiet that convey and explore the nuances among feelings that come with large amounts of time spent alone.

My photography searches for the evidence of humanity—an unmade bed, an abandoned shoe, an open window, a dilapidated gate—to discover who was or will be in that space. I want to find places that mean something to whomever may have inhabited them but appear vacant at the moment they are photographed. I felt the mundane, uninhabited nature of these scenes best convey solitude.

In the first few months of working, I mostly photographed inside houses. I was drawn to the easily recognizable evidence of their inhabitants. Later, other spaces that were not as easily recognizable as inhabited, such as landscapes and abstract pieces, were incorporated into my work.

Throughout the year, I have been consistently concerned with the geometry of my compositions with the exploration of different patterns of light. How light shapes what we see, how it defines space, and how its presence and absence creates mood fascinates me.

I used analog and digital processes in making and printing my photographs. I have printed on 11 in. x 14 in. Ilford warm tone, silver gelatin paper, and made inkjet prints on Baryta Photo Rag paper of the same size. I started by printing on the Ilford warm tone paper in the darkroom, and found that it allowed for more detail to be visible in heavy shadows. I chose the Baryta Photo Rag because it was the closest digital equivalent. I have used both the analog and digital processes in order to print each photograph in the process that suits it best. The photographs are taken primarily with Kodak 400TX film, in both the 35mm and 120mm sizes; I have on several occasions used Ilford HP5 for my 35mm photographs. Both of these films have a wide exposure latitude, allowing me to push and pull them as needed and giving me the flexibility to shoot in a wide range of lighting situations.

My work is inspired by that of Abelardo Morell, mainly from his three series Childhood, Still Lives, and Light, Time, and Optics. He records light and shadow, patterns, and domesticity to create compelling photographs of the everyday. I draw aspects of my creative process from Haruki Murakami’s book What I Talk about When I Talk about Running, where Murakami seamlessly connects his work as a fiction writer with running.

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About The Author:  Emily Williams is a recent graduate of Haverford College majoring in Fine Arts and History.  Class of 2020.

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PSA: Pennsylvania Primary Day – VOTE!

PSA: Pennsylvania Primary Day – VOTE!

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Huiping Tina Zhong: Captivity

Photography and Text by Huiping Tina Zhong, Copyright 2020

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Captivity

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I have been following the update of the COVID-19 crisis since the very beginning when it was first discovered in China. Because I’m a Chinese international student, I’ve been worrying about my family and friends back home, although I did not expect that crisis to hit the US so soon and so hard, given that there were plentiful time for the government to execute precautions since the breakout in China in early January. I was in immense frustration, anger and sadness for the beginning of the social isolation period, yet now that intense emotions have passed, I’m increasingly aware of the fact that I’m not only physically trapped in my tiny apartment, but also am emotionally trapped in my lack of motivation and in my lethargy. Many have encouraged the public to face the current crisis with a positive attitude, yet it occurred to me that it was important to ponder negative feelings. Pondering and taking in these sensations in isolation is not only important for personal development, but also necessary for the progress of a society. Therefore, I shot these series of 24 pictures in my apartment to sit with the self that feels trapped.

When one is trapped, the positive thing is that one actually gets to spend more time with objects and self. As one observes the quotidian objects from different angles, the structures of these objects start to deconstruct. As their geometrical and linear structures get foregrounded, objects lose their identities while acquiring new poetic sensibilities. 

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About The Author:  Huiping Tina Zhong is a senior majoring in Art History at Bryn Mawr College. To access additional articles by Huiping Tina Zhong, click here: https://tonyward.com/iceland/

 

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