Category Archives: Affiliates

Joy Bao: Sensational Structure

Photo: Naoya Hatakeyama

 

Text by Joy Bao, Copyright 2020

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Sensational Structure

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Born in 1958, Naoya Hatakeyama is a Japanese photographer who works closely with both natural and city landscape. While his works are mostly documentary, Hatakeyama also develops a graphic style that shows his precise composition and formal elements. One of his most famous series, which is also included in Photography (London, Stone, Upton), is named “River Series” and records Tokyo’s river channels. The slim, vertical frame is divided by the concrete construction right in the middle, and presents two separated views of the building and its reflection. The river is a natural element, yet becomes a media that carries the manmade city view. However, the hierarchy between the actual view and its reflection is erased because of the clear separation in the middle of the frame that gives two portions equal size of space. The reflection is almost presented as an individual view, a more abstract and sensational reading of urban life. A similar contrasting reflection is presented in another series of work, “Underground”, shot in 1999. Focusing again on the water tunnel in Tokyo city, both the reality and its reflection are originally unknown for the viewers, as opposed to “River Series”. The incompleteness of the reflection highlights the construction of the tunnel, and with a central light that illuminates the dark underground space, the reflection creates a color scheme that is surprisingly similar to the galaxy.

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Photo: Naoya Hatakeyama

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Another series shot by Hatakeyama during the 90s, “Maquettes/Light”, turns completely to the sight of urban architecture and uses black and white photography to emphasize on the light and dark contrast in the city during night time. In the photo selected, the apartment building is stripped down to the graphic pattern of its structure, mainly the lights and fire escape on each floor. While the trace of people living disappears, the numerous individual illuminations add in warmth to the emotion aspect of the picture. Just as the previous two series, viewers can have a refreshing perspective of the structure of different sights that are familiar or unfamiliar, but at the same time keep an almost romantic reading for the works.

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Photo: Naoya Hatakeyama

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The more recent work shot in 2005 is from another series of his, “Blast”, in which Hatakeyama turns towards the documentation of a more violent event, the explosion of limestones. Unlike the previous three photos, the selected picture, just like other ones in the same series, depicted the explosive event and provide a vivid image of the middle of a certain motion. The selected photo particularly presents a gradation effect of colors with the dust created from the explosion. In a literal deconstruction of stable structure, the hazy dust becomes a contrasting element in terms of both texture and color, adding a mysterious layer to the powerful scene.

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Photo: Naoya Hatakeyama

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Similarly, in the most recent “Slow Glass” series, Hatakeyama also uses water drops on glass to add another layer to the pictures. The selected photography presents the bottom half of Tokyo tower in the night time behind the glass. Opposed to the earlier urban sights that contain a clear structure, here the viewers can only recognize a general shape of the tower as the lens focuses on the water drops. The harsh lines of architecture is softened, but it still remains recognizable from the signature red color and the shape. By eliminating a clear vision of structure, Hatakeyama partially masks the tower with an ambiguous yet gentle layer for the viewers.

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Photo: Naoya Hatakeyama

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Referenced Works:

Hatakeyama’s biography: https://www.sfmoma.org/artist/Naoya_Hatakeyama/

“Portfolio: Naoya Hatakeyama – Everything is Illuminated”: https://www.tate.org.uk/tate-etc/issue-46-summer-2019/naoya-hatakeyama-maquettes-light-everything-illuminated

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About The Author: Joy Bao is a senior enrolled at Bryn Mawr College. Class of 2020. To access additional articles by Joy Bao, click here: https://tonywardstudio.com/blog/summers-day/

 

Also posted in Art, Blog, Cameras, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, Haverford College, Men, Travel

Tatiana Lathion: An Examination of the Work by Barbara Kruger

Text by Tatiana Lathion, Copyright 2020

 

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An Examination of the Work by Barbara Kruger

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           For this research assignment, I have chosen to exam the work of Barbara Kruger, an artist that is mentioned in our textbook as well as one I have been intrigued with since high school. Her work consists of both black and white photographic material accompanied by a collage style of bold text in black, white and red type. Her art typically deals with more feminist constructs in relation to the consumerist ideals and power dynamics that surround societal identity. Her more notable art was cultivated in the 80s and has been an inspiration to many of the artists that exist today.

            The first image depicts a young girl imitating a silly posture with the word “no” layered on top. This image is particularly impactful, as I believe it exemplifies the deeper more profound aspects of some of her work. This young girl is juxtaposed against the word no. No, being a word that many girls of this era were told is inappropriate for their gender. In a time where the feminist movement was gaining a new wave of traction, Kruger was able to expand the meaning of her work by adding one simple word. I think the bold type adds fierceness to the work and juxtaposed against the youthfulness of the girl, creates a stark impression of what is allowed and questions what isn’t.

            Her work demonstrates a type of elegant editorial style. Many of her pieces could be and have been utilized in more graphic publications such as books or magazines. The placement of the type on top for the images demonstrates the control of a vision and minimalist execution. In image 2, Kruger created an image that would be used as a poster for the Women’s March in 1989 in support of abortion rights. This piece was created through the use of the processed image spliced with the negative of the same image. The words “ Your body is a battleground” are layered with this imagery. The image quite literally highlights the dark sides of womanhood. However, the image does not directly address the message of abortion, but rather highlights womanhood in a more general fashion. In this way, abortion is not highlighted as the issue, but rather women.

            Her work has concentrated around what it means to be female. As such, I think images 3,4, and 5 deal with the different aspects of what is expected from women, especially during the time periods in which these images were created. Particularly, in image 5, the image appears to be pinned in place. This effect is especially powerful because sewing is typically seen as a labor of women. The words “ We have received orders not to move” accompanies the image. This layering both touches on the labor in which women are more forced into as well as identifies the lack of control over their own bodies.

            It is unfortunate, that while these images deal with women, they primarily address the concerns that surround white womanhood and neglect the intersectionality of minority women. Her images for the most part, are of white women and the issues surrounding a more middle class lifestyle. Her imagery, while powerful, negates many of the other experiences of minority individuals. This brings into question the oppressiveness of her work. Does her work oppress those neglected by being the societal systems that her work chooses to ignore? It seems unclear if these choices were intentional, but as the work has become more recognizable worldwide, it is hard to neglect the power behind work that addresses societal problems in relation to only those of the majority.

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About The Author: Tatiana Lathion is a senior enrolled at Haverford College majoring in Political Science and Government. To access additional articles by Tatiana Lathion, click here:https://tonyward.com/tatiana-lathion-uncertainty-new-beginnings/

 

 

            

Also posted in Art, Blog, Friends of TWS, Haverford College, History, Popular Culture, Women

Athena Intanate: The Caress of Nan Goldin

Photo by Nan Goldin

 

Text by Athena Intanate, Copyright 2020

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The Caress of Nan Goldin

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For me it is not detachment to take a picture. It’s a way of touching somebody – it’s a caress” – Nan Goldin

Documentary photography, it seems, has died.

The advancement of photoshop and other image-altering apps has decidedly marked the onset of increasingly manufactured images. Even those taken to inform are buffed and staged to an inch of perfection. The Adnan Hajj controversy has metamorphosed, repeating itself in various incarnations from print to editorials. Reality seems to have traded itself in for aesthetics; candid slice-of-life captures are a dying breed.

But with Nan Goldin, whose work so delicately takes you by the hand and envelops you in them, you seem to remember what it feels like to be human, purely and unadulteredly. Since her very first published works of transvestites and transsexuals in 1973, Goldin has arguably cemented her place as one of the defining documentary photographers of the 20th century. No subject matter is too dark, too complicated, too taboo to untangle for her – through her lens, the world is made accessible, open to everyone to peer into, and asked to understand.    

Nan Goldin’s expansive career began when she was first introduced to the camera at 15, in 1968 (Hals in The New Yorker, 2016). Still bearing the grief of her sister’s recent suicide four years before, Goldin found solace in the camera, with its ability to capture not only relationships but also political issues in what was popularised as the snapshot aesthetic.

“My work originally came from the snapshot aesthetic,” she says, “Snapshots are taken out of love and to remember people, places, and shared times. They’re about creating a history by recording a history.” (Goldin in Britannica Biographies, 2012)

Goldin’s work attests to such a sentiment, with works of sheer rawness capturing intimacy, her own relationships, the opioid crisis, the HIV crisis, and the queer community. There appears to be a filmic quality to some of them; Goldin herself stated that fashion photography powerhouses Guy Bourdin and Helmut Newton influenced her immensely (Westfall in BOMB magazine, 1991). Her self-portrait Nan and Brian in bed (1983) is one such example where theatricality is present. A self-portrait of her and her lover at the time, golden lighting seeps through a blinded window, illuminating the smoke from the titular Brian’s cigarette. His half-turned profile seems aloof, tired; Nan, curled up in the sheets all in black, looks on in longing but also sadness. A heartbreak story appears to be unfolding before the viewer; it is, just as she said, a creation of history “by recording a history” in the most poignant way.

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Photo by Nan Goldin

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Other works of Goldin, however, are taken in a much more documentative manner, reminiscent of works by Diane Arbus, August Sander and Larry Clark, all of whom she has cited as inspiration (Westfall in BOMB magazine, 1991). One such example is Yogo Putting on Powder (1993). Taken on one of her trips to Bangkok, this is an example of Goldin’s broader work documenting the LGBTQ community, with particular focus on transvestites and transsexuals. From her Asian Drag Queens series, the viewer is given a clear-cut view into the ritualistic act of putting on makeup. The titular Yogo is dressed in nothing but jeans and a belt, and sits perched on a chair. Clothes are haphazardly hung up in the background, a behemoth of sparkle and ruffle and glitter while Yogo, almost nonchalantly, powders their face in a compact mirror. A blurry elbow protrudes in the left of the photo, indicating the presence of another person.

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Photo by Nan Goldin

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Goldin, in her pursuit of capturing emotion and the pathos of love, found a way to document even the most mundane in sentimental exposition. This is similarly seen in the tender embrace in Teri and Patrick on their Wedding Night (1987), or the tight clasp of The Hug (1980), or her own representation of opioid abuse in Aperture Drugs on the Rug (2016). Goldin’s works are annotative, captures of the relationships she saw around her (as well as of her own), but at the same time evocative, perhaps making her one of the best documentative photographers of all time. While she uses her photographs to demonstrate realities, often in her push for activism, Goldin makes you forget that you are viewing an exercise in instrumentalism. You are looking, instead, at the depths of human nature in their purest, raw forms. Her work seems to plunge its hands into the viewer, reminding us that we are looking at something incredibly human. It is humans, baring themselves wide open to other humans, offering the chance of relief in the splinters of recognition.

And what a joy, what a privilege, Goldin makes that process.

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Bibliography

Als, Hilton, (June 27, 2016). “Nan Goldin’s Life in Progress”. The New Yorker. Retrieved online March 27, 2020 at https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/04/nan-goldins-the-ballad-of-sexual-dependency

The Editors of Encyclopedia Britanica (December 09, 2019). “Nan Goldin”. Encyclopædia Britannica, inc. Retrieved online March 27, 2020 at https://www.britannica.com/biography/Nan-Goldin

Westfall, Stephen (1991). “Nan Goldin” (Interview). BOMB Magazine. BOMB Magazine. Accessed online March 27, 2020 at http://bombmagazine.org/article/1476/nan-goldin

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About the Author: Athena Intanate is a freshman enrolled at Haverford College, Class of 2023. To access additional articles by Athena Intanate, click here:https://tonywardstudio.com/blog/one-day-at-a-time/

 

Also posted in Art, Blog, Cameras, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, History, lifestyle, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life, Women

Cindy Ji: Artist Report-Sandy Skoglund

Artwork by Sandy Skoglund

 

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Artist Report by Cindy Ji, Copyright 2020

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Sandy Skoglund

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Sandy Skoglund is am American photographer, sculptor, and installation artist. She is known for creating surreal installations and photographing them without creating the space with digital technology. Bright and bold colors and sculpted life size animals set in a domestic setting acts as a motif in her photographs. Created with the Cibachrome process, the aggressive colors contrast greatly with the aesthetic of black and white photography, giving the images an unreal atmosphere. Skoglund took several months to create the set for each image, and used her neighbors as models. As Anne Reverseau writes in AWARE: Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions, Skoglund’s work perfectly symbolizes the hybrid practice of contemporary art; for her, sculpture is the starting point for organizing a space that she transforms into an installation, and which photography records. The photographic medium is vital, allowing a variety of materials to be brought together, contained within one creative process. Her works therefore exist in two forms: the installation and the photographs.”

One of the most renown pictures of Skoglund’s is Radioactive Cats. An old man sits by the table as the woman looks for food in the refrigerator. The man and the woman wear grey monotonous clothes in a grey room, in which the furniture looks broken and the walls unfinished. In that grey room, lime-green life-sized cats fill up the room. Those cats took over the room. The cats are on the floor, on the table, on the fridge and so on. It’s hinted in the title that cats turned lime-green after being exposed to radioactive materials after the atomic bombing. And, as a result, the people struggle to eat and survive. Skoglund’s photograph ridicules a possible devastating situation and turns it into a parody. The lack of color, food, and decorations in human households, compared to brightly colored, lively and healthy cats allow us to imagine a world ruled by radioactive cats. The photograph also makes fun of our physical and mental fragility to survive in a hypothetical post atomic bomb world.

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Artwork by Sandy Skoglund

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The colors and humor in Radioactive Cats is bold, and it immediately takes us to another universe created by Skoglund. This is an interpretative photograph which requires the viewer to investigate elaborate details, and to imagine a post apocalypse world run by radioactive green cats. It’s dark and humorous. When talking about this photograph, the laborious process to make this image needs to be appreciated and mentioned again. The originality of the surreal set and Skoglund approach to photography makes her one of the most important contemporary artists, sculptors and photographers in modern time.

Similar to Radioactive Cats, Germs are Everywhere, is another surreal photograph that shows Skoglund’s humor. A woman sits on a chair with a drink on her hand in a living room. The color of the room is bright green and an overwhelming amount of chewed pink gums are stuck all over the wall, furniture, chair, and even in her drink. The woman does not seem to notice existing gums in her room. The intimate and domestic place is not a place for germ infestation. The woman’s posture and the setting of the photograph remain as our everyday life. However, chewed gums which represent germs, are visible. The photograph creates a very disturbing atmosphere and makes us question invisible bacteria and germs that exist in our private spaces. It’s a nightmare coming to life. This photograph, therefore, allows us to reflect the world that we live in. Even though this photograph was made in 1984, looking at it in 2020 feels very relevant as the pandemic outbreak changes people’s behavior and lives.

Another domestic scene can be seen in Revenge of the Goldfish. This is a photograph of a blue bedroom invaded by orange goldfish. Skoglund’s choice to work with two opposing colors is noticeable in this photograph as her previous work did. The blue room elicits the room as a water tank. The water tank, instead filled with pet goldfish, trapped two humans. The orange goldfish in the room float in the room, rest on bed, and play with the bedroom lights. Revenge of the Goldfish has many similarities as Radioactive Cats and Germs are Everywhere; as the viewer starts to recognize and identify Skoglund’s motif of bright color, surreal conceptual images, sculpted animals, which all take place in a domestic/household setting. Skoglund brings an unfamiliar concept and color pallet to familiar and intimate space, and transforms it into something humorous, bizarre and intriguing.

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Artwork by Sandy Skoglund

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The next image does not take place in a domestic setting, but the way that the photograph is composed feels very familiar. Spirituality in the Flesh is a photograph of a sculpted female figure wearing a blond wig and a blue dress. The person that the figure represents feels familiar and natural. However, her skin and the walls and floors behind and underneath her is fully covered with raw meat. In the process of making the image, Skoglund bought eighty pounds of raw hamburger to cover the figure and the walls. The texture of raw meat is stomach-turning. Vivid handprints on the wall are heightened by the cleanliness of the figure’s blond hair and the blue dress. Human’s flesh became an animal’s flesh when creating a life size human figure. The ‘flesh’ we use to imply our skin because ‘flesh’ refers to dead raw animals. It’s gruesome and jarring but seeing familiar food items in a completely different environment makes it hard to take one’s eye off of it.

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Artwork by Sandy Skoglund

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Last but not least, Skoglund’s Walking on Eggshells, is a photograph of a beige colored bathroom where bathroom tiles are replaced by eggshells, and filled with rabbits and snakes. Two nude models face their back as they walk toward the sink and the bathtub. The footprints are shows as remnants of fragmented eggshells.  are visible left footprints on floor. Unlike Skoglund’s other work (Radioactive Cats, and Revenge of the Goldfish), the color palette used in Walking on Eggshell is limited and muted. Because of this, the formal quality and the composition of the photograph is highlighted. Once again, the viewer sees the recurring theme of the domestic scene, sculpted animals, and surreal quality of the set. Elaborate decorative tiles of hieroglyphic imagery on the wall completes the surreal quality of the image. As mentioned in the title, Walking on Eggshell, the models walk on figural and literal eggshells. Skoglund’s play with visual imagery and idiom is humorous and brilliant. Both in figurative and literal sense, it’s anxiety provoking to think about walking into a bathroom covered with egg shelled tiles and rabbits and snakes.

Sandy Skoglund’s meticulous way of making photographs needs to be praised and recognized as brilliant artists, sculptor, and photographer. She merges two mediums in intricate ways and incorporates her humor to marry familiar and unfamiliar concepts in one space. For these reasons, her photographs are very much praised as one of the best contemporary artworks in America.

Bibliography

Barrett, Terry. Criticizing Photographs : an Introduction to Understanding Images 4th ed.    

Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2006.

Bloomfield, Paul. 2008. “Sandy Skoglund: Radioactive Cats.” Exhibit 29 (5): 39–39.

Reverseau, Anne. n.d. “Sandy Skoglund.” AWARE Women Artists / Femmes Artistes.

Accessed March 30, 2020. https://awarewomenartists.com/en/artiste/sandy-skoglund/.

“Skoglund, Sandy.” n.d. Grove Art Online. Accessed March 30, 2020.

https://www.oxfordartonline.com/groveart/view/10.1093/gao/9781884446054.001.0001/oao-9781884446054-e-7000097698.

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About the Author: Cindy Ji is a Junior at Bryn Mawr College. Class of 2021. To access additional articles by Cindy Ji, click here: https://tonyward.com/flower-show/

 

Also posted in Art, Blog, commentary, Current Events, Environment, Friends of TWS, Haverford College, History, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life, Women

Huiping Tina Zhong: Remebering Iceland in the Time of Pandemic

 

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Photography and Text by Huiping Tina Zhong, Copyright 2020

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Remembering Iceland in the Time of Pandemic

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At the beginning of 2020, no one could have foretold what happened in the past several months. The COVID-19 has become a global pandemic, and as a result I am trapped in my apartment, not being able to go anywhere outside these enclosed white walls. After a 14-day self-quarantine in my room because I show some symptoms of a cold, I begin to yearn for the grand exterior, the vast, open world that is behind my 1 m2 window. I recall that I have a ton of  left over photos I took when I visited Iceland two years ago, and I’ve been procrastinating over editing them. I pull them out, and once more, I’m fascinated by the beauty of that experience. The icy mountain peaks, the blue water, the hazy steam of the blue lagoon, the ashy color palette of white snow, pale yellow grass, cyan sky and light gray tarmac road. Going through these pictures, it pulls me back to that dreamlike land—the land of ice and fire.

Iceland has been my dream destination since my middle school years. I’ve seen countless dramatic photos of the grandiose landscape and colorful sky of Iceland. However, when I arrived at Iceland together with my long-time friend from middle school, the Iceland that I imagined was not exactly the same as what I saw. Because it was winter when I visited, the days are short (from 11am-3pm) and daylight is quite dim. Wintertime is not a popular tourism time for Iceland, hence for most of the time, our tiny bus of 10 people was the only vehicle traveling in the grand color field of light gray, icy-blue, pale yellow, and white. Standing in front of the silent snow mountains and the roaring waterfalls, I felt incredibly small and insignificant. However, at the same time, I felt an incredible connection with nature, therefore I hope my lens can capture the misty, brisk and quiet air of Iceland. In some of the shots, there is my friend facing away from the camera. In some of the shots, there are no people, or there is only a person in the distance. The reason for this choice is that I wanted the camera to be simply an observer of a traveler, of a land, or of a distant memory.

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About The Author:  Huiping Tina Zhong is a senior majoring in Art History at Bryn Mawr College. To access additional articles by Huiping Tina Zhong, click here: https://tonywardstudio.com/blog/stories/

 

Also posted in Blog, Cameras, Documentary, Environment, Friends of TWS, Haverford College, History, lifestyle, Photography, Popular Culture, Student Life, Travel, Women