A.H. Scott: What is it About A Man?

Photo: Tony Ward, Copyright 2021

Poetry by A.H. Scott, Copyright 2021

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What is it About A Man?

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What is it about a man?
Could it be his gaze?
Or, maybe the way he can put a woman in a delectable haze?
It could be the inebriation of folly
Yet, he envelopes you with sobriety
Maturity hasn’t lessened his playful air
A man’s profile is cut like a diamond so far from the rough
He’s a gem and he knows it
A lucky woman is joyful when he shows it
But, damn, you don’t want a young stud, cuz’ a man of many a season can make you howl
Young gun may think he’s got it like Flint
But, it is a man whose eye has got that certain glint
And, yes, a man can make you moan
It’s that pleasurable pop of excitement that peppers your soul
What is about a man?
He’s fun in the sun
He’s a swoon by the moon
He’s a wave hello
He’s a caress so mellow
He lets you know what he wants from a wink
A man of substance can put you on the brink
Brink of desire
Brink of hellfire
And, if a woman is wise she’ll appreciate all of it
He needn’t place a finger upon your skin to bring about aspects of sin
But, when his hands touch you, you go wild without haste
He can say something that knocks you off your feet
Even if you haven’t known him for long, he makes you feel complete
He holds your hand with pride as you walk down a street
You feel like you walk on a cloud, when a man smiles at you
He doesn’t need the big come-on to make his point
He uses the soft-sell to make you melt
Then again, it’s how a woman takes what he’s got to dish out
Now, that’s another thing she’s talking about
Bumpin’ n’ grindin’ can scratch her itch
But, damn, if she’s too forward with him, he’ll think she’s a bitch
Rounding second base can be a modest pace
Yet, could that keep a satisfied grin on his face?
Maybe yes, maybe no
But, in the end, only that man and woman would know
Soft or hard stroke is decided on what could bring forth that flow
Hellcat or kitten?
Which would make a man roar?
Depends on what sets the moment off
What is about a man?
In the end, the answer is simple
HE just is.
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About The Author: A.H. Scott is a poet based in New York City and frequent contributor to Tony Ward Studio. To read additional articles by Ms. Scott, go here: https://tonywardstudio.com/blog/dont_stop_the_dance/
 

Milan Burnett: I Am That I Am

portrait of beautiful black model
Milan Burnett. Photo: Tony Ward. Copyright 2021

Text by Milan Burnett, Copyright 2021

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I Am That I Am

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Looking back, outside of the mundane gossip and remedial conversation, there were two things that I hated to hear most while in school – “Milan, why are you so nice all the time?”, and the lackluster attempt of a so-called compliment, “You’re really pretty for a black girl!”. Being asked why am I so nice all the time always guaranteed for a quick, sarcastic remark such as, “So would you rather me be an asshole?!”. Simply because, well, who doesn’t like nice people? As for the latter, the best I could conjure up was an awkward, “Thanks, I guess?”. For any young girl growing into her teens, being called pretty by a cute boy in school was like an invisible badge of honor, one that could instantly put a pep in her step for the rest of the day. However, when being complimented gets limited to just “for a black girl”, unfortunately, that badge of honor does not wear the same.

I never labeled myself as the “pretty” or “popular” girl in school. I always wore glasses, and nothing special stood out about me. It wasn’t until I was in my late teens, early 20’s, that I realized the standard, regurgitated, concept of beauty, was just that – Standard. After tons of self reflection, and learning more about my indegineous background, I realized just how exclusive I truly was. Of course, eventually growing into my hips and womanly figure helped with that, as well. From the shape of my eyes, to the coils of my hair, to the complexion of my skin – I am exclusive – Regardless of who may feel otherwise.

Gaining knowledge of self has changed my thought process completely, making it easy for me to be comfortable in the skin I was blessed with. Once timid, shy and self conscious, I now wake up with an everlasting pep in my step, radiating an abundance of self-love and confidence. I am beautiful as I am. I am fierce. I am strong. I am a luminous etheric being, manifested in the physical form. I am Milan.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR : Milan is currently an administrative healthcare professional, originally from New York, now residing in Philadelphia. Aspiring model and real estate broker. Free thinker. Humanitarian by nature. Spiritual revolutionary in the making. This is Milan’s first contribution to Tony Ward Studio.

Bob Shell: On Photography

Photo by Bob Shell, Copyright 2021

Photography and Text by Bob Shell, Copyright 2021

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On Photography

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Someone asked me recently why I wasn’t posting much about photography anymore. Before my conviction in August of 2007, I was ‘a renowned photographer with a long-established reputation,’ to quote Federal Judge Glenn Conrad. I’d been doing photography/cinematography since my teens in the early 1960s, following in the footsteps of my father, who was an avid photographer/cinematographer. He had numerous cameras and lenses, still and 16 mm movie cameras, and a nice darkroom in the basement of our house in Roanoke, Virginia. 

The first time I saw an image I’d photographed magically appear on a blank sheet of photo paper when I dunked it into the developer, I was hooked. 

People today who grow up using digital photography on smartphones never experience that magic moment. I find that sad. 

Over the years I’ve been in prison I’ve watched traditional photography die. First one, then another, then one by one, all of the photography magazines have died. At its peak, there were dozens of photography magazines. I’d get seven or eight a month. Popular Photography had over a million subscribers at its peak. 

Today, I get two photography magazines, Nature Photographer (www.naturephotographermag.com) and Professional Photographer, the magazine of the Professional Photographers of America, to which I belonged for many years. If others have survived as print magazines, I’m not aware of them. 

Even Digital Camera, the magazine I worked for after Shutterbug, is now gone. My favorite of all, and one I wrote many articles for, Rangefinder, is history. 

I also get Digital Imaging Reporter, today’s incarnation of Photo Industry Reporter, a trade publication I used to write for, but it’s published erratically these days. 

Of course, there are some Internet photography magazines, but, so far as I know, nobody has been able to make any real money from an Internet photography magazine, and if a magazine can’t make real money, it can’t attract, pay, and keep good editors and writers, who have to support themselves and their families. 

The once-popular hobby of photography has seriously declined. Any hobbyist who wants to own the finest film cameras ever made can do so for pennies on the dollar, although if they need service, finding someone who can repair them may not be easy. Friends of mine have bought Hasselblad, Mamiya, Bronica, Rollei, Contax, Leica, Nikon, Canon, Minolta, Pentax, etc., outfits very cheaply. Darkroom equipment is even cheaper. 

Although the selection is limited, film is still readily available, but you may be unable to buy it locally. In fact, increased demand has even induced Kodak to put one version of Ektachrome back into production. 

I’ve tried to keep up with photographic technology, despite the fact that I haven’t so much as touched a camera in over fourteen years, and have yet to even see one of the mirrorless cameras that are fast taking over for SLRs. 

My cameras, lenses, and other photographic equipment is all in storage, and will remain until my release. Hopefully I won’t be too decrepit by then to rebuild my studio and life as a photographer. 

I used many different cameras over my years in photography. During two different periods I owned camera shops, first for several years in the 1970s, then from 1980 until 1990. The cameras that were my workhorses in 35 mm were Canon, and continued to be until my career was ended in 2007. I wrote several books about Canon, including ‘Canon Compendium,’ the official history of the Canon Camera Company. 

In medium format, I used Bronica S2a cameras with their superb Nikkor lenses before switching to Rollei SL66 in the mid-1970s. I continued with Rollei, using their advanced 6000 series up to my last Rollei, the 6008i, an amazingly capable camera. 

In large format I used a Toyo 4 X 5 monorail view camera with several Schneider-Kreuznach lenses in my studio, and a Zone VI field camera outdoors with those same lenses. 

In the rare instances when a client wanted 8 X 10, I had an old Eastman 2D camera made in 1918 that I used. It still worked fine. I fitted it with a Voigtlander Apo-Lanthar 300 mm lens in a Compur Electronic shutter, matching old to new. 

When Polaroid made 8 X 10 film, I shot quite a bit of it in that camera using a borrowed Polaroid processor. 

I was an early adopter of digital photography, though, and was doing most of my work with Canon and Nikon digital SLRs by 2002, but the speed at which traditional photography collapsed was a total surprise, and shock, to me and most of the industry. Luckily, I was able to sell most of my medium format pro cameras before the bottom completely dropped out of the market, using the money to pay lawyers, several of whom said, ‘Don’t worry, you’ll never spend a day in prison.’ Here I sit, fourteen years later, still in prison for something that never happened. It is ridiculously difficult to get a false conviction overturned in today’s American legal system.

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About The Author: Bob Shell is a professional photographer, author, former editor in chief of Shutterbug Magazine and veteran contributor to this blog. He is currently serving a 35 year sentence for involuntary manslaughter for the death of Marion Franklin, one of his former models.  He is serving the 13th year of his sentence at Pocahontas State Correctional Facility, Virginia. To read additional articles by Bob Shell, click here: https://tonywardstudio.com/blog/hidden-truth_ufos-pentagon/

Editor’s Note: If you like Bob Shell’s blog posts, you’re sure to like his new book, COSMIC DANCE by Bob Shell (ISBN: 9781799224747, $ 12.95 book, $ 5.99 eBook) available now on Amazon.com . The book, his 26th, is a collection of essays written over the last twelve years in prison, none published anywhere before. It is subtitled, “A biologist’s reflections on space, time, reality, evolution, and the nature of consciousness,” which describes it pretty well. You can read a sample section and reviews on Amazon.com.

Brittany Goldberg: Heavy Metal Hair Salon

Interview by Katie Kerl, Copyright 2021

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Brittany Goldberg: Heavy Metal Hair Salon

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Uncovering interesting women entrepreneurs that are down to earth, smart, witty, and pretty in Philadelphia is really a fun thing. It is hard enough to find decent women friends in general as we get older.  Finding women who want more for themselves outside of their homes not confined to 9-5 is refreshing!

 Women that know who they are, and have known for quite sometime seem to be the ones who make it. To me that is the key to success in anything you do. If you can not see your own vision, a set business plan, and a determination to win, it is just not going to work for you. 

I came across Brittany from her now husband, Jason Goldberg. Jason has been tattooing me at Olde City Tattoo for about five years. This was before the shut down. I had just started a sleeve and was sitting in the chair telling my  girlfriend who happened to come with me that I wanted pink hair. Jason let me know his soon to be wife was opening a salon that did bold color. Now, if you have seen my tattoos you would know If I can trust someone to permanently put bold color on my body; Jason just might have had a great suggestion. 

Needless to say, I made an appointment with Brittany. 

Upon arriving at the Heavy Metal Hair Salon, I knew I was in the right spot!

 A bright pink and black colored interior, funky Heavy Metal art around, and the nicest girls working there. There is no elitist attitude like in some salons.  My favorite piece of art happened to be the gold Kiss head. Brittany could not have been more informative. I thought it would take forever to get the color I wanted. She let me know it would be done that day.

Looking around everyone had perfect hair. There was nothing to be worried about. Not only was Brittany informative, she was personable. Talking to her I felt like I knew her for a while. You always end up talking to your hairstylist. Oftentimes I find myself feeling awkward in really high end salons unless it is for a wedding, or a glam event. I also do not live a normal lifestyle that does not leave me with much to say to a lot of people in general. When I feel comfortable in my surroundings; I am sure there are plenty of people who wished my gift of gab was not so great haha!

When I feel someone’s zest for life and a different vibe; that is what leaves me wanting to know more about the person behind the business. I watched as Brittany took my drab COVID hair to a vibrant dark to light pink. I was so happy to feel Alive again. It’s amazing what a little hair color can do for your soul. 

It felt like COVID continued forever…

When restrictions were lifted I  went back to have my tattoo worked on. I asked how Brittany was doing opening the salon in the pandemic. Jason said she is doing amazing!

I knew then I should interview her. 

Anyone that opened a new business in COVID, a female entrepreneur, and  living an alternative lifestyle that she loves should be on Tony Ward’s platform.

Tony also agreed, and used Brittany as this month’s cover photo.

The photo shoot was a fun day. I always love seeing Tony in his element, and getting to take my own behind the scenes shots as my piece comes together.

Brittany did an amazing job! There is no wonder why Heavy Metal Hair is doing so well. 

She is a pleasure to work with!

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Interview as follows:

Full name:  Brittany Goldberg

Age: 32

Hometown: Abington PA

Present Residence: Philadelphia 

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KK– As a child what activities were you involved with? 

BG– I played a lot of sports growing up (basketball, track, cheerleading, volleyball) and did attend acting and modeling school as well!

KK– What was your family dynamic like?

BG– I’m the second youngest of 5 kids, so things were chaotic at times. We’re all close in age though so it was fun having people to hang out with all the time.

KK– At what point in your life did you realize normalcy was not for you ?

BG– I don’t know that I’ve ever been normal haha!

KK– What was the first bold color you dyed your hair, and how old were you? 

BG– The first color I ever had put in my hair was by my sister while she was coloring her hair fuchsia. It was just a little streak in the underneath of my hair. I was probably 12ish.

KK– If it was much younger was your family pleased?

BG– I think my mom was pretty pissed when she saw but was always supportive of me coloring my hair at a young age after that. As long as it was done by a professional.

KK– When you started being more true to who you are now; were you met with any opposition from your parents, friends,  previous employers, or in relationships ?

BG– I’ve pretty much  been this way as long as I can remember, and I definitely struggled finding a solid group of friends until I was a teen, but my family was always accepting of who I was. I have been turned down jobs though for looking “too extreme” in the past.

KK– Were all of your tattoos and piercings accepted as well ? 

BG– Tattoos yes! My parents took me to my cousin’s shop (Kadillac Tattoo in Manayunk ) for my first tattoo and my mom got one with me. Piercings were sometimes an issue though but to be honest I did go a little overboard with those.

KK– At what age did you start doing those ? 

BG– Other than my ears, my belly button was my first piercing at I think 15?

 My first tattoo was 17

KK– What is your favorite piece on your body? 

BG– The next one 😉

KK– At what point did you realize bold alternative cosmetology was for you?

BG– I always loved doing hair, so when my counselor in high school mentioned tech school as an option, I was sold immediately. When I was a teen, bold hair wasn’t that common especially where I grew up. I wanted to be able to color my hair how I wanted. Beauty school was where I was going to learn the basics. I started tech school at the age of 16 and went every morning for two years straight. I was basically ready to graduate the same time I was graduating high school 

KK– Were your career choices accepted as you got older having an alternative to a 9-5? 

BG-Yes! My parents were always super supportive of me doing hair.

KK– What other career paths were you on before you found what truly made you happy?

 BG– None! Although, when I moved to the Bay Area I thought maybe I didn’t want to do hair forever, so I tried a few different jobs out there. After moving home it was right back to hair.

KK– Being married to a tattoo artist makes you both quite the creative duo. I noticed on your Heavy Metal Mom IG page you were married at the Bates Motel? 

How did that concept come about? The photo of you in the dress and the frayed leather jacket was amazing! The spiked crown just made it perfect. 

BG– Yes! We originally had our wedding planned for August 2020 in Vegas. Unfortunately, due to COVID we had to cancel. We were pretty upset about that and hoped to keep it in Vegas, but weren’t sure what the future would hold for travel. We made a decision to just get married here on Halloween (our favorite holiday). 

While looking for the right venue, I got an ad for Bates Motel haunted house and thought it wouldn’t hurt to ask if we could have our wedding there. They got back to us right away and we’re willing to let us use the space! It actually worked out pretty perfectly!

 I ended up buying the first dress I found which was just a simple hi-low black dress. I saw a dress posted in an Instagram post a month or so later and debated it but it seemed too over the top for our outdoor DIY wedding. A week before the wedding I caved and emailed the designer of the dress and asked if she could have it shipped from Germany by the wedding. She sent it out that night and it showed up 2 days before the wedding. I didn’t even open the box until I was at my friend’s house getting ready the morning of our wedding. I brought both dresses, but once we opened the box we knew I had to wear that one, so that whole look came together in about an hour before the wedding!

KK– Did you have someone help plan the wedding, or did you come up with all the little details on your own? 

BG– We DIY’d the whole thing! We couldn’t have done any of it without the help of our friends and family though. 

KK– Being a mother, were you ever judged for your lifestyle and working a lot ? If so, was the judgment more from other mothers, or men? Were you able to overcome it?

BG– Yes, I know people judge me (other moms for sure) but I really don’t care haha. As long as my son is happy, and taken care of that is all that matters.

KK– what are your hobbies outside of your job? 

BG– I love going on adventures with my family. Going to see live music and wrestling, and playing slots. 

KK– How old is your son? Does he think he has a pretty cool mom?

BG– He’s about to turn 7. I like to think he thinks I’m cool!

KK– What kind of personality is he growing into? One of a more normal standard, or taking after his edgy mother ?

BG– He’s so funny and incredibly smart! I don’t know if he’ll follow the edgy lifestyle, but who knows.

KK– Do you have any other certifications, or academic achievements that helped you along the way? 

BG– I did go back to school a few years back to become an educator, but my son got sick, and being a single parent working, schooling, and caring for a sick child proved to be too much of a challenge so I took a temporary drop. Not sure I’ll go back and finish the hours though now that the salon is up and running.

KK– How old were you when you discovered your talent for bold color hair? 

BG– It took a while for me to really take hair seriously. I think before I had my son, it was more just a job. It wasn’t until I got a little older, and more mature that I really stepped up my game and furthered my education. I left my job at Supercuts and went to a more high end salon. It was definitely out of my comfort  zone, but really allowed me to find my place in the beauty industry.

KK– What are your favorite products for keeping bold colored hair vibrant?

BG– Definitely the Brazilian bond builder line (especially the color lock) R+CO gemstone shampoo & conditioner. And if you’re feeling confident, the Celeb Luxury Viral Colorwash & Bondfix Conditioner 

KK– What are some common misconceptions clients have when they come in wanting bold colors ? 

BG– Thinking I’m a magician haha! No, a lot of the time I think they’ve either had a bad lightening experience, or no experience with lightener. They’re convinced their hair will be “fried” if we need to lighten it. Products have come a long way though, and I think it’s important to educate our clients before we start any services so they know what to expect.

KK– What kind of training do you send your employees to as far as continuing education on color ? 

BG-Classes have been sparse since COVID. We all keep up on new trends and show each other new tricks. We take advantage of online classes as well.

KK– When did you decide you wanted to be an entrepreneur, and open your own salon? 

BG– I wasn’t happy where I was, and Jason and I had kicked the idea around for a while. I saw a commercial property pop up on Passyunk Avenue.  We figured we would  at least  check it out. Unfortunately, it needed too much work so we passed. The property manager let us know about a salon who’s lease was up in a few weeks though. We signed the lease on that one just a few days later. It all happened really fast! Two weeks after the lease was signed the city shut down, so we had plenty of time to get everything together. 

KK– What were some of the obstacles you had to overcome opening being we live in Philadelphia?

BG– Luckily it was already a salon so we really only had to do cosmetic work. During COVID it was really hard getting the equipment and color I needed. I was hesitating even buying the bigger equipment considering there was no end in sight with COVID, and I wasn’t sure I’d ever be able to open. State board still came out to inspect which I was really grateful for, and that gave me the motivation to actually furnish the area. Then get it ready to open once they gave us the green light.

KK– Was the city accepting of your eighties themed alternative salon? 

BG– Yes! The other businesses on The Ave were super welcoming!

KK– How did you come up with the theme?

BG– I really just had a vision for what I always wanted my salon to look like, so it was really awesome seeing it come to life! Some things I had how I wanted but then decided I didn’t love it so it’s still evolving each day.

KK– Do you find respect is an easy thing to achieve in your area(s) of work? 

BG– Sometimes. I think a lot of people think hairstylists just, “play with hair” all day. That’s not the case at all, and I think stylists deserve so much more! We truly do it all. 

KK– Recently you had the first post COVID event at the shop. How did the Sick66 Jewelry pop up go? 

BG– The pop up was a pretty big success!  We had a really nice turnout and everyone had an awesome time! I’d like to start doing pop ups every couple months or so. 

 KK– What do you do to overcome stress?

 BG– I’m a huge advocate for self care. I take time alone whenever I can to just unwind from the day. 

KK– Do you have a wellness routine? 

BG– I go to my favorite spa in the city every month for a massage and some me time. My job really takes a toll on my body, so it’s so important to take care of myself physically and mentally.

KK– What is it like trying to balance being a mother, wife, and now running a successful new business? 

BG– Very challenging haha. I’m still figuring everything out, but we’re getting there!

KK– Have you had many mishaps when trying to achieve these bold colors on other people? 

BG– Sure have! I think we’d all be lying if we said we haven’t. I think transparency is key. If I’m not happy with something, my clients know I’ll say something right away and do what I need to get it right. 

KK– Are your friends supportive of you not having much free time now?

BG– Yes! It’s hard, but I’ve been making it a priority to make time for friends now that things are starting to be a bit more steady. 

KK– Are you currently happy with your endeavors?

BG-Happier than I could explain, and so grateful everyday.

KK– What tips would you give women just starting on their road to entrepreneurship?

BG– I’m still figuring things out myself, but I guess if I could give any advice, it would be to stay true to yourself and always do what you think will be best for your business. You might piss some people off along the way, but at the end of the day, no one will care more about your business than you. 

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Learning more about Brittany made me  respect mothers that go after it all even more so than I did before. Otherwise, how are we really fulfilled living through someone else ?

The days of having to choose family or career are over.

Brittany has her son, an awesome new husband, got married in COVID, had a DIY wedding that was gorgeously the right amount of Halloween & class combined into one, and a flourishing new alternative color hair business.  If you think for one second as a woman in 2021 you have to stay stuck in your situation; it might be time to dig deeper. 

 I suggest you start talking to women like Brittany. 

She might just give you that inspiration to START your own dream.

Look out for more upcoming events at the Heavy Metal Hair Salon

Heavy Metal Hair Salon

1604 E Passyunk Ave 1st Floor

Philadelphia, Pa 19147

(215)-467-1757

www.Theheavymetalhairsalon.com

IG- @heavymetalhairsalon_

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About The Author: Katie Kerl is a Philadelphia based veteran contributor to Tony Ward Studio.

E- Mail: Kate.kerl32@gmail.com

Instagram: @kerlupwithkate 

For additional articles by Katie Kerl, click here:https://tonywardstudio.com/blog/katie-kerl-philly-reloaded-life-after-lockdown/

Rachel Grand: Eating the Forbidden Fruit

Photography by Rachel Grand, Copyright 2021
 

Photography and Text by Rachel Grand, Copyright 2021

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Eating the Forbidden Fruit

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In this composite portrait, I play with the notions of the abject and how it can play with the traditions and experience of Bryn Mawr College. I create a narrative that dramatizes the transformation of going to a women’s college. Many love it here, many can’t wait to graduate, but most will agree that this place is special. Living and learning among these somber, stone castle-like buildings reminds its students of its identity.

In each student’s freshman year, they are given a lantern during the ceremony that signifies the passing of wisdom. In my portrait, the figure with the donkey head acts as the physical embodiment of a mystical bearer of knowledge, shining the light of the iconic Bryn Mawr lantern and giving the forbidden fruit, like that of the tree of life, to its new student. The construction of other figures in the frame is inspired by princess and purity culture. The strappy white dress, instead of signifying sexual virginity, signifies informational virginity. She willingly approaches the donkey figure because she wants to know more.

Once she eats the forbidden fruit, and begins to gain knowledge herself, she maintains her corporeal beauty, but becomes one of the abject with the head of a frog. She lies like a corpse, having now understood the world, and her place in it. With her women’s college education, she is too smart to be attractive, as shown by her frog head. She mourns herself because she understands that society will never truly let her rise to her full potential. Her dress remains unchanged as a reminder of the implications of her physicality as a woman, despite her animal head. 

As a second semester senior, thinking about what I have learned here, and where I will go next, this series plays with those anxieties.

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About The Author: Rachel Grand is a senior enrolled at Bryn Mawr College majoring in Fine Arts and History. Class of 2021.