Field Report: Happy Hour and Available Light

Happy Hour. Bernie's Bar & Restaurant. Photo: Tony Ward, Copyright 2018
Happy Hour. Bernie’s Bar & Restaurant. Photo: Tony Ward, Copyright 2018
 

Photography and Text by Tony Ward, Copyright 2018

.

Field Report: Happy Hour and Available Light

.

I was sitting at the bar at Bernie’s restaurant and bar in Glenside Pa. enjoying a delicious Ketel One martini when I finally realized why I like this place so much.  The food, beverage and sexy millennial wait staff is excellent. The modern well appointed interior space is beautifully designed accented by natures natural light. Well positioned, the bar faces west with large plate glass windows behind it looking out on to Glenside’s charming suburban neighborhood. There’s an outdoor seating area for diners as well.  I’ve observed on several occasions when the sun sets behind the bar on a clear day, it seems to have  a magical impact on the mood of the diners and wait staff.  Everyone seems to be happy in that moment. The light is deliciously seductive at that hour in this place.

I had my compact SonyRX100V camera handy and framed a few pics that I think captures the feeling during this happiest of  hours.  Camera was balanced for daylight with ISO 400, F-2.8 at 1/80th of a second. Zoom lens was set to 20mm. It’s hard to beat the nimbleness and refined resolution of this Sony capturing device.

.

Tony_Ward_Studio_happy_hour_Bernie's_Glenside_Pa.available_light
Happy Hour. Photo: Tony Ward, Copyright 2018

.

Tony Ward shooting with the SonyRX100V.
Tony Ward shooting with the SonyRX100V.

.

About The Author: Tony Ward is a fine art photographer, author, blogger, publisher and Adjunct Professor of Photography at the University of Pennsylvania. To access additional field reports by Tony Ward,  click herehttp://tonyward.com/2018/03/20/field-report-sony-rx100-v/

 

Rongrong Liu: A Macro View of Utensils

 

Photography, Text and Video by Rongrong Liu, Copyright 2018

.

A Macro View of Utensils

.

As a foodie for years, my approach to this still life assignment started with the thought of taking pictures of food settings. However, an insufficiency of tableware at home, I shifted my focus to emphasize the auxiliary but inseparable tools, utensils.

Sometimes under the lightsource, the highlight on the edges of spoons can cast a shiny half-eclipse reflection on the table so beautifully that I decided to utilize the reflective property of metals. I began with a single spoon and fork with a black background, but the lonely shadow turned out to be dull, hence I added more and more of them until they  overlapped.  Under the macro lense, with an f-stop at 2.8, the utensils have an abstract look.  It is my first attempt at macro lens photography, and it is the first time I realized the life philosophy “how things look depend on how you look at it” can apply to this series, literally.  The abstraction attracted me so much, that I made use of this look to shoot knives and a kitchen strainer.  At first glance, it might be hard to see what they are, but once I added a title to the series, the riddle was solved.

I hardly ever took any still life pictures before because I used to think still life is still, everyone at the same spot I am standing can take exactly the same photo, but the one thing I missed is composition. It is true that you can frame a photo with the same still objects, but these ordinary objects that we take for granted can be more than interesting if you actually look “into” them. How things look depend on how you look at it. It’s all about a point of view.

.

.

About The Author: Rongrong Liu is a Junior enrolled in the College of the University of Pennsylvania, Class of 2019. To access additional articles by Rongrong Liu, click herehttps://tonywardstudio.com/blog/rongrong-liu-looking-at-photographs/

 

Picture of the Day: Matera, Italy

Tony_Ward_Studio_Picture_of_the_Day_Luca_Pioltelli_Italy_old_town
Photo: Luca Pioltelli, Copyright 2018
 

 

Photography and Text by Luca Pioltelli, Copyright 2018

.

MATERA, ITALY

.

Known as “la Citta Sotterranea” (the Subterranean City), Matera is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, having been inhabited since the 10th millennium BC.  Its historical center “Sassi”, is considered a World Heritage Site UNESCO since 1993.

On September 21, 1943, the Materani rose against the German occupation, the first Italian city to fight against the Nazis.

.

Tony_Ward_Studio_Picture_of_the_Day_Luca_Pioltelli_Italy_old_town_self_portrait
Self Portrait by Luca Pioltelli, Copyright 2018

.

About The Photographer: 

Born and raised in Milan , Italy, where, in the mythical eighties, he decided to give his body and soul to one of his favorite hobbies : ….. soccer.
Unfortunately , legs and talent, not as powerful as his unbridled passion, force him to look into other directions: …Luca pretty soon lands on another love , photography.

He moves to New York in 1991 where he starts working with some of the great names in the business : Fabrizio Ferri, Steven Klein and Paolo Roversi.
He considers himself a very lucky man:
Luca lives in a city he loves, he loves his wife ( two kids ) who live with him in Brooklyn, New York. He makes a living out of a job he loves …

His hobbies: movies, interior design, history books, art , museum visits… while sometimes , inevitably , he still puts on his soccer shoes…

He has been published in several International Magazines such as : AD Germany, German Vogue , l’Uomo Vogue , Casa Vogue, Italian Marie Claire,
The New York Times while collaborating with prestigious
Architectural Firms and gifted Designers.

.

You can follow his work on his instagram account : @lucapioltelli
or check his website herehttp://lucapioltelli.com

 

Field Report: Sony RX100 V

Tony_Ward_Studio_dolls_window_trocadero_night_club_philadelphia_Display
Photo: Tony Ward, Copyright 2018
 

 

Photography and Text by Tony Ward, Copyright 2018

.

Field Report: Sony RX100V

.

I’ve been working with the new Sony RX100V since December of 2017. It was first time that I made a complete switch in shooting style and I was mostly interested in a camera that was mirrorless, high in resolution and extremely portable.  I switched to digital capture in 2004 and worked my way through several single lens reflex DSLR’s before I decided to make a wholesale change with respect to day to day shooting.  There is nothing like a high end 50 megapixel  camera for making large exhibition prints. However, the RX100V is holding up extremely well with its 21 megapixel image sensor.

The photograph taken above speaks to the spontaneity inherent in keeping this small camera in my pocket; whenever I leave the studio. I was on my way to the Reading Terminal market in center city Philadelphia to test the camera in a fast moving environment, when I came upon this window display at The Trocadero, a famous night club in center city where I have  photographed to the wee hours of the morning in the early nineties.  This window display instantly captured my attention and reminded me of the fun times mingling with the interesting club goers at this iconic night spot.

With my camera set to Shutter priority at 1/60th, and ISO of 100, the cameras metering system calculated the f-stop at 2.8. With this setting I was able to capture excellent detail on the fly with no camera shake. By shooting in RAW I maximized the cameras pixel power and was able to crop out any extraneous information on the edges of the frame without a loss of image quality. The next big test for the camera is to make large exhibition prints.  I will report on printing results in another post.

.

To access pictures taken at The Trocadero during the early 1990’s, click herehttp://tonyward.com/early-work/alternative-lifestyles-1995-1998/

.

To access additional pictures taken with the Sony RX100V, click herehttp://tonyward.com/2018/03/09/george-krause-lunch-legend/

.

Tony Ward Shooting With the Sony RX100V
Tony Ward Shooting With the Sony RX100V

.

About The Author: Tony Ward is a fine art photographer, author, blogger, publisher and Adjunct Professor of Photography at the University of Pennsylvania. To access additional articles by Tony Ward,  click herehttps://tonywardstudio.com/blog/george-krause-lunch-with-a-legend/